Posthumous Olympians

OK, we know, you read the title of the post and thought we had lost our minds. And “competing” in the Olympics is probably a bit of a misnomer. But the title is correct and there have been Olympians who were deceased at the time of their Olympic participation or when they were honored at the Olympics.

Not well known is that from 1912-48 there were Arts Competitions held at the Olympic Games. Artists, musicians, and writers entered their works into competitions and received medals for their work. In a number of cases the artists entered their works, but died before the Olympics and the Arts Competitions started. So effectively they competed posthumously.

Also in 1924 and 1936 the IOC awarded Alpinism Medals for the best feats of Alpinism since the previous Olympics. This is also not well-known but it is interesting that this concept was set forth by Pierre, Baron de Coubertin in his original list of events for the Olympics at the Sorbonne Congress in 1894. In several cases, some of the climbers were killed during their Olympian climbing feats, notably several members of George Mallory’s Everest expeditions in the early 1920s (see our previous post on Olympstats about Olympians Atop Everest).

So, yes, there have been posthumous Olympians. Here is the complete list:

Athlete Nation(s) Sport(s) Era
George Bellows USA ART 1932
Karl Borschke AUT ART 1936-48
Glenn Coleman USA ART 1932
Alois Dryák TCH ART 1932
Jozuë Dupon BEL ART 1936
Thomas Eakins USA ART 1932
Frank Gillett GBR ART 1928
Philip Hale USA ART 1932
Otto Hofner AUT ART 1932-48
Ulrich Hübner GER ART 1932
Tait McKenzie CAN ART 1912-48
Luc Albert Moreau FRA ART 1948
Charles Rumsey USA ART 1928
Ladislav Toman TCH ART 1936
George Mallory GBR ALP 1924
Toni Schmid GER ALP 1932
Antarge Sherpa IND ALP 1924
Lhakpa Sherpa IND ALP 1924
Narbu Sherpa IND ALP 1924
Pasang Sherpa IND ALP 1924
Pembra Sherpa IND ALP 1924
Sange Sherpa IND ALP 1924
Temba Sherpa IND ALP 1924

Nations With Most Olympic Medals But No Golds

So which nations have won the most Olympic medals but never managed a gold medal? For many years, the answer to this question was Mongolia, which had won 15 medals through the 2000 Olympics, before breaking thru with 2 gold medals at Athens in 2004.

But the answer is now The Philippines, which has won 9 medals – 2 silvers and 7 bronzes, but has never won a gold medal. Well, in a sense. If we include demonstration sports, in 1988, Arianne Cerdena won the women’s bowling demonstration event at Seoul. But in full medal events, no Filipino has ever mounted the top step of the podium.

Here are all the nations that have won 2 or more Olympic medals without winning a gold medal:

NOC Gold Silver Bronze Medals
The Philippines - 2 7 9
Puerto Rico - 2 6 8
Moldova - 2 5 7
Malaysia - 3 3 6
Namibia - 4 - 4
Iceland - 2 2 4
Lebanon - 2 2 4
Singapore - 2 2 4
Bohemia - 1 3 4
Ghana - 1 3 4
Qatar - - 4 4
Independent Olympic Athletes - 1 2 3
Kyrgyzstan - 1 2 3
Saudi Arabia - 1 2 3
Tajikistan - 1 2 3
Sri Lanka - 2 - 2
Tanzania - 2 - 2
Vietnam - 2 - 2
Haiti - 1 1 2
United Arab Republic - 1 1 2
Zambia - 1 1 2
Afghanistan - - 2 2
Kuwait - - 2 2
West Indies Federation - - 2 2

Two “nations” above no longer exist and will not be moving off the list. The United Arab Republic was a team formed from Egypt and Syria in 1960. Syria left the alliance in 1961, but Egypt continued to use the name at the 1964 and 1968 Olympics. The West Indies Federation competed only in 1960, with athletes from Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, and Barbados.

If we limit ourselves only to the Summer Olympics, the above list still holds – none of those nations have won a Winter Olympic medal. If we look at only the Winter Olympics, the leader is Latvia, which has won 7 Winter Olympic medals – 4 silver and 3 bronze – without winning gold. The Winter list of those winning 2 or more medals without a gold is as follows:

NOC Gold Silver Bronze Medals
Latvia - 4 3 7
Hungary - 2 4 6
Yugoslavia - 3 1 4
Luxembourg - 2 - 2
Korea DPR (North) - 1 1 2

Now breaking this down by gender, the following nations have won the most medals in men’s event without winning gold, which is again very similar to the overall and summer lists given above, although now Colombia is tied with The Philippines:

NOC Gold Silver Bronze Medals
Colombia - 4 5 9
The Philippines - 2 7 9
Puerto Rico - 2 6 8
Moldova - 2 4 6
Malaysia - 3 2 5
Serbia - 1 4 5
Namibia - 4 - 4
Lebanon - 2 2 4
Ghana - 1 3 4
Liechtenstein - 1 3 4
Qatar - - 4 4
Iceland - 2 1 3
Bohemia - 1 2 3
Kyrgyzstan - 1 2 3
Tanzania - 2 - 2
Haiti - 1 1 2
Syria - 1 1 2
Tajikistan - 1 1 2
United Arab Republic - 1 1 2
Zambia - 1 1 2
Afghanistan - - 2 2
Kuwait - - 2 2
West Indies Federation - - 2 2

Among women, Argentina is a big leader, with 11 female medals, but no golds. The full list is as follows:

NOC Gold Silver Bronze Medals
Argentina - 5 6 11
Mongolia - 1 2 3
Singapore - 1 2 3
India - - 3 3
Independent Olympic Athletes - 1 1 2
Venezuela - - 2 2

And just to be fully anal about this, we’ll look at medals won in mixed events without a gold. Once again, Argentina leads this list with 5:

NOC Gold Silver Bronze Medals
Argentina - 3 2 5
Portugal - 3 1 4
Bulgaria - 1 2 3
Mexico - - 3 3
Indonesia - 2 - 2
Peru - 2 - 2
Cuba - 1 1 2
Ireland - 1 1 2
The Ukraine - 1 1 2
Saudi Arabia - - 2 2

Will be fun to see which of these nations come off these lists in Rio and Pyeongchang.

Peter Camejo

Venezuelan Sailor, US Presidential Candidate, Social Activist

Full Name       Pedro Miguel “Peter” Camejo Guanche

Used Name    Peter Camejo

Born                   31 December 1939; Queens, New York (USA)

Died                   13 September 2008; Folsom, California (USA)

Vitals                179 cm / 65 kg

Games Sport Event Place
1960 Summer Sailing Two-Person Keelboat (Star) 21

Although he competed in sailing for Venezuela (with his father Daniel Camejo) at the 1960 Rome Olympics, Peter Camejo is one of only four Olympians to have run for President of the United States (along with Bob Richards, Bill Bradley, and Benjamin Spock). Born to a wealthy Venezuelan family, his mother had Peter born in New York, because of the better health care, and he thus earned dual citizenship. He later attended MIT but dropped out to pursue civil rights work in the American south, and participated in civil rights marches in Selma, Alabama. He returned to school at U Cal Berkeley but was expelled in the 1960s, amazingly for Berkeley, for his vocal criticism of the Vietnam War, although ostensibly it was for “using an unauthorized microphone.” In 1968, while still a student he was placed on Governor Ronald Reagan’s list of the 10 most dangerous Californians because of his anti-war protests.

In 1976, Camejo ran for President as a member of the Socialist Workers’ Party, a Trotskyist organization. On the ballot in 18 states, he received 90,986 votes nationwide. He later was tossed from the party after he alleged corruption among the leadership. In 1991 he helped establish the Californian Green Party, and he ran for Governor of California in both 2002 and 2003 as a member of that party. In 2002 he received 393,000 votes, or 5.3% of the electorate, the largest total vote by a third-party candidate for California governor since 1946. In 2004, Ralph Nader had Camejo on his ticket as a Vice-Presidential candidate. Nader and Camejo came in third in the Presidential election, after the Republican and Democratic candidates, receiving 460,000 votes, or 0.4% of the national vote.

In the last decade of his life Camejo served as the CEO of a financial investment firm that focused on socially responsible investments. He died in 2008 after a two-year struggle with lymphoma.

Olympian Suicides

Olympians have usually achieved great success in sports, but such success does not always translate to other fields, nor does it guarantee happiness in one’s life. Unfortunately a number of Olympians were unable to deal with the realities of everyday life and chose to end their own. Here is the list of Olympians who have committed suicide.

Athlete Nation(s) Sport(s) Era Notes
Bill Agee USA ATH 1928 Committed suicide by slashing his wrist.
John Albrechtson SWE SAI 1968-76
Percy Almstedt SWE SAI 1920 Committed suicide by shooting himself.
Charles Aman USA ROW 1904
Alfred Annan USA GOL 1904
Yevgeny Babich URS ICH 1956 Committed suicide by hanging himself.
Eugène Balme FRA SHO 1908
Heidi Becker-Ramlow GDR DIV 1972-76
Yevgeny Belosheykin (DNS) URS ICH 1988
Ahmet Bilek TUR WRE 1960
Edith Bonlieu FRA ASK 1956 Committed suicide as member of the Order of the Solar Temple.
Franco Bontadini ITA FTB 1912 Committed suicide after a disappointment in love.
Erich Borchmeyer GER ATH 1932-36
Hugo Borja MEX BAS 1936 Committed suicide after his daughter died of an infection; date unknown
Günter Böttcher FRG HAN 1976 Committed suicide in a hospital.
Enrico Bovone ITA BAS 1968
Walter Brödel SAA FEN 1952
Jürgen Brümmer FRG GYM 1988 Committed suicide by jumping from a bridge after having killed his son.
Ricardo Cardoso BRA JUD 1988 Committed suicide in 1991 after a love disappointment.
Edwin Everett Codman USA ART 1932
Richard Corts GER ATH 1928
Ivan Viscount d'Oyley USA FEN 1900 Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.
Sigi Denk AUT CYC 1972 Committed suicide by hanging.
Jacques Dimont FRA FEN 1968
Christophe Dupouey FRA CYC 1996-00
Knut Torbjørn Eggen NOR FTB 1984 Committed suicide. Noted of him that he "had come to the point of life where he was more afraid to live than to die"
István Énekes HUN BOX 1932
Jackson Fear AUS ARC 1996
Ragnar Fogelmark SWE WRE 1912
Lucien Gaudin FRA FEN 1920-28
Oskar Gloeckler GER ART 1928-32
Daan de Groot Ned NED CYC 1952
David Guttman SWE ATH 1912 Committed suicide by hanging himself.
Jerry Heidenreich USA SWI 1972
Claudia Heill AUT JUD 2004-08 Fell from the sixth floor of her flat. It is possible that she committed suicide per original press reports.
Gabriel Hernández DOM BOX 1996 He committed suicide by hanging (aged 27) nine days after his last bout against Ralph Monday.
Lutz Hoffmann GDR GYM 1980
Robert Howard USA ATH 1996-00 Committed suicide after murdering his wife.
Herbert Huber AUT ASK 1968 Committed suicide by hanging.
Yelena Ivashchenko RUS JUD 2012 Jumped from her apartment window which was on the 15th floor.
Peter Jaks SUI ICH 1988-92 Committed suicide by train.
Hamilton Jukes GBR ICH 1924
Jo Kaiser GER ATH 1960
Anneliese Kapp GER DIV 1936
Kentaro Kawatsu JPN SWI 1932
Per Kinde SWE SHO 1920 Committed suicide by hanging himself.
František Kobzík TCH ROW 1936 Committed suicide to avoid capture during World War II.
Yoshio Kojima JPN ATH 1956
Clive Longe GBR ATH 1968 Committed suicide after murdering his girlfriend.
Frank Mackey USA POL 1900 Committed suicide – shot himself while suffering from a terminal illness.
Kersten Meier FRG SWI 1972 Committed suicide by jumping from a bridge.
Eugenio Monti ITA BOB 1956-68
Mika Myllylä FIN CCS 1992-98
Takeichi Baron Nishi JPN EQU 1932-36 Possibly committed suicide during the Battle of Iwo Jima.
Marco Pantani ITA CYC 2000
Dušan Pašek TCH ICH 1984-88 Committed suicide by shooting himself.
Víctor Peralta ARG BOX 1928 Committed suicide; shot himself while suffering from terminal prostate cancer
Nils Persson SWE SAI 1912 Committed suicide by hanging himself.
Jeret Peterson USA FRS 2002-10 Died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head; found in Lambs Canyon (Utah).
Antonio Pettigrew USA ATH 2000 Committed suicide by an overdose of pills containing diphenhydramine.
Dan Pippin USA BAS 1952
Vladimír Podzimek Tch TCH SKJ 1984 Committed suicide by hanging himself.
Andrey Prokofyev URS ATH 1980 Committed suicide by hanging himself.
Pierre Quinon FRA ATH 1984
Fausto Radici ITA ASK 1976 Committed suicide by shooting himself with a handgun.
Rhoda Rennie RSA SWI 1928
Guy Revell CAN FSK 1964
Jesús Miguel Rollán ESP WAP 1988-04 Died after a fall from a balcony of a rehabilitation clinic where he was treated for depression – possibly he committed suicide.
Ludwig Count von Salm-Hoogstraeten AUT TEN 1912 Committed suicide by jumping to avoid capture by Nazis.
Stephen Scherer USA SHO 2008 Committed suicide by shooting himself.
Thomas Schleicher AUT JUD 1996 Committed suicide while in prison.
Shamil Serikov URS WRE 1980
Christine Smith AUS ASK 1964
Boris Strel YUG ASK 1980-84
Doc Strong USA WRE 1936 Committed suicide in a jail cell where he sat for public drunkenness.
Willy Sulzbacher FRA FEN 1900 Committed suicide by shooting himself.
Darren Sutherland IRL BOX 2008
Gholam Reza Takhti IRI WRE 1952-64 Officially he committed suicide but a lot of sources mention theories about being murdered for his political activities.
Hidemitsu Tanaka JPN ROW 1932
Harold Thomas NZL BOX 1932 Committed suicide by jumping from a train few hours after his fiancee's death.
Adán Torres ARG ATH 1948 Committed suicide upon becoming disabled after being struck by a vehicle – date unknown.
Fritz Traun GER ATH/TEN 1896
Kokichi Tsuburaya JPN ATH 1964
Ernst Udet GER ART 1936 Committed suicide –  shot himself after years of alcoholism and drugs
Vladimír Vávra TCH WRE 1928
Sammy Wanjiru KEN ATH 2008 Committed suicide after being found in love triangle by his wife.
Billy Ward AUS BOX 2012
Mike Whitmarsh USA BVO 1996
Percy Williams CAN ATH 1928-32
John Wood CAN CAN 1968-76
Hiromi Yamafuji JPN CYC 1964
Ikuko Yoda JPN ATH 1964
Masami Yoshida JPN ATH 1984-92

TOP Sponsorship

It was announced recently that Bridgestone has signed with the IOC through 2024, renewing their commitment as a TOP Sponsor. TOP originally stood for The Olympic Programme, but was changed a few years ago to stand for The Olympic Partners. TOP was a program started in the early 1980s by Dick Pound and Juan Antonio Samaranch as a way to help make the IOC less dependent on the largesse of American television networks, which through the 1970s provided almost all the income received by the IOC and the Olympic Family. The principle of TOP was to have only a few sponsors who would pay high rights fees to be exclusive Olympic Sponsors within their category. Thus Coca-Cola could be a sponsor, but TOP exclusivity would prevent Pepsi-Cola from also joining the group.

Bridgestone TOP Sponsor

Over the years the IOC has had 29 different TOP Sponsors, starting with TOP I from 1985-1988. There have been a maximum of 12 companies in any Olympiad, after having 8 companies involved with TOP I. Below we provide a table of all the TOP Sponsors and the years they have been part of the program, along with numbers and estimates of the moneys generated by TOP. Originally the IOC announced how much money was generated by TOP, but the contracts have become somewhat more secretive so for the more recent years (and coming years), the numbers are estimates.

There have been commitments for TOP IX and TOP X through 2024 from both Panasonic and Bridgestone. Panasonic has been a TOP Sponsor for all 10 versions of the program, the only company to date with that distinction, although I suspect it is highly likely that both Coca-Cola and VISA will renew their sponsorship and join Panasonic as TOP Sponsors for every version of the program. Other long-running sponsors are McDonalds, now committed thru 6 TOP programs, and Samsung, committed thru 5 TOP programs. Of note, Coca-Cola’s Olympic sponsorship dates back thru 1928, as the longest running Olympic sponsor, well predating TOP.

A few companies have opted in for one Olympiad and never renewed. Included in this group are Acer, FedEx (then Federal Express), Johnson & Johnson, Lenovo, Manulife, Mars, Ricoh, and Schlumberger/SEMA.

Company / TOP I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X ###
3M x x 2
Acer x 1
Atos Origin x x x x 4
Bausch & Lomb x x 2
Bridgestone x x x 3
Brother x x 2
Coca-Cola x x x x x x x x x 9
Dow Chemical x x x 3
Federal Express x 1
General Electric x x x x 4
IBM x x 2
John Hancock x x x 3
Johnson & Johnson x 1
Kodak x x x x x x 6
Lenovo x 1
Manulife x 1
Mars x 1
McDonalds x x x x x x 6
Omega x x x x 4
Panasonic (Matsushita) x x x x x x x x x x 10
Philips x x 2
Proctor & Gamble x x x 3
Ricoh x 1
Samsung x x x x x 5
Schlumberger SEMA x 1
Time/Sports Illustrated x x x x 4
UPS x x x 3
VISA x x x x x x x x x 9
Xerox x x x 3
Number of Sponsors 8 12 10 11 10 12 11 11 10 2 29
Money (millions $US) $96 $172 $279 $579 $663 $866 $958 $1155 $1150 $250 $6168
Begin 1985 1989 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 2013 2017 2021
End 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 2012 2016 2020 2024

 

Did an eight year old compete and win a medal at the Olympics?

When it comes to tracking down missing biographical details for Olympians who competed over a hundred years ago you might expect the trail to be pretty cold by now – and you’d be right. Without divulging too much of our methods, I’ll just say that it can be done if you’re willing to put in the hard yardage cross referencing known information with newspaper reports, censuses, birth records and even ships’ manifests. The best person I know at this is my Estonian colleague Taavi Kalju and it was while researching some French and Belgian Olympians from the early part of the last century that he found a surprising piece of information. The star of this story is about as obscure an Olympian as you could possibly find, a Belgian coxswain who steered the Royal Club Nautique de Gand (Dutch Koninklijke Roeivereniging Club Gent) rowing eight in the Olympic Games of 1900 and 1908 by the name of Alfred Van Landeghem.

Taavi searched the birth registers of Ghent for a possible match and found only one. Now this is where things get interesting because this Alfred Van Landeghem was born on the 26th October 1891 which would make him 8 years and 316 days old when he competed at the Paris Olympic Games of 1900. Not surprisingly that would make him the youngest known Olympian ever and, since his team placed second in the final, the youngest known Olympic medallist ever as well. The 1900 Olympic rowing events were notable for the use of very young coxswain. Some, like the mysterious young French boy picked out of the crowd as a replacement cox for the Dutch pair, have vanished into history without their name or age being recorded for posterity. (There is a name we have seen but we don’t trust it, and won’t even publish it here.) A picture of the late substitute exists which suggests he may be in his early teens or possible as young as 10.

So what of Van Landeghem? Was he really an 8-year-old Olympic medallist? No pictures seem to exist of his Olympic exploits but a postcard was published of the Belgian crew at the 1909 Henley Regatta.

Offical result of the final 1909
Van Landeghem is sitting directly in front of the trophy.

The Van Landeghem born in 1891 would be 17 in 1909 and this appears to tally with the appearance of the man in the picture. Van Landeghem was a cox of Royal Club Nautique de Gand from 1900-1903 winning multiple European titles in coxed pairs, fours and eights.
In the following years Royal Club Nautique de Gand used other coxes (Raphael Van der Waerden & Rodolphe Colpaert), but in 1908 and1909 again Van Landeghem was against used as cox for his club, including at the 1909 Henley Regatta. Ghent crews were very prominent in European rowing circles in early 1900s, winning multiple European titles and the Henley Regatta Grand Challenge Cup in 1906, 1907 and 1909.

Sadly there is a tragic postscript to this story as he died on 19 October 1914, a week shy of his 23rd birthday. It may well be that he was killed in action, as 19 October was the first day of the Battle of Ypres although his name does not appear on the lists of Belgian war dead that we have so far found.

We have been in touch with his club who are helping us with our enquiries but, at the moment, all we can say it that seems likely that we have the right man though we don’t have that final piece of conclusive evidence.
If anyone can help on this matter feel free to contact us via this blog or by contacting http://www.sports-reference.com/feedback/

Farhang Mohtadi

Field Data
Full name Farhang Mohtadi
Original name فرهنگ مهتدی
DOB 6 January 1926
Sport Basketball
Nation Iran
Year(s) 1948
Finish 14

Farhang Mohtadi played basketball for Iran at the 1948 Olympics. He had earned a B.E. degree from Teheran University in 1945 but in 1948 was studying at Birmingham University in England. Mohtadi was better known as a tennis player and during his years in England played at Wimbledon seven consecutive years (1949-55), although he lost in the first round each year. In 1954 he lost in the final of the North England Hardcourts Championships to Polish player Ignacy Tłoczyński.

He eventually earned a B.Sc. degree and later a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Birmingham. Mohtadi finally settled in Canada where he taught at the University of Calgary, where he served as chairman of the department of chemical and petroleum engineering and director of public relations in the engineering department.

His son, Nick Mohtadi, played briefly on the professional tennis tour, including a bronze medal win at the 1979 World University Games in mixed doubles and one doubles appearance at Wimbledon. Nick Mohtadi later became a renowned orthopaedic surgeon, with special expertise in sports medicine and clinical epidemiology.

Olympians Swimming the English Channel

The best known long-distance swim in the world is a crossing of the English Channel, connecting Dover, England and either Calais or Cap Griz Nez, France. It was first done in 1875 by Matthew Webb, but it was another 36 years before the feat was repeated, this time by Bill Burgess, a British swimmer who had competed at the 1900 Olympics, making him the first Olympian to swim the Channel.

Since that time, it has been performed multiple times by Olympians, as one would expect. In 1926 Trudy Ederle, who had won 2 bronze medals and a gold medal at the 1924 Olympics, became the first woman to make the crossing, swimming from Cap Griz Nez in France to Dover. Ederle was trained for her swim by Bill Burgess.

The most successful Olympic swimmer to have swum the English Channel was likely John Kinsella, who won a silver medal in the 1968 1,500 freestyle and a gold medal in the 1972 4×200 free relay. Kinsella crossed the Channel in 1979, swimming from England-to-France.

Athlete Nation(s) Sport(s) Era Channel Swims
Greta Andersen DEN SWI 1948-52 1957/58/59/64/65 Five successful attempts (Best 13:40). France-to-England in 1957/58/59; England-to-France in 1964/65.
Miguel Arrobas POR SWI 1992 2008 England-to-France (9:30).
Bill Burgess GBR SWI/WAP 1900 1911 England-to-France (22:35). Second swimmer to cross English Channel in 1911.
Bimal Chandra IND SWI 1948 1959 France-to-England (13:50).
Edith van Dijk NED SWI 2008 2003 France-to-England (9:08)
Trudy Ederle USA SWI 1924 1926 France-to-England (14:39). First woman to swim English Channel. Third person to swim France-to-England.
Jo O-Ryeon KOR SWI 1972 1982 England-to-France (9:35).
John Kinsella USA SWI 1968-72 1979 England-to-France (9:10).
Yury Kudinov KAZ SWI 2012 2007 (7:05)
Linda McGill AUS SWI 1964 1965/1967 [3] All France-to-England (Best 9:59 (1967)). Three crossings in 1967. 9:59 at the time a record for women.
Eva Mortensen DEN SWI 1988 1996 England-to-France (10:46).
Veljko Rogošić YUG SWI 1960-64 2004 England-to-France (11:27) at the age of 63.
Gilles Rondy FRA SWI 2008 2004 England-to-France (7:54)
Arati Saha IND SWI 1952 1959 France-to-England (16:20).
Petar Stoychev BUL SWI 2000-12 2006 England-to-France (7:21); 2007 England-to-France (6:57) – first crossing under 7 hours and record time from 2007-2012.
Edward Temme GBR WAP 1928-36 1927 France-to-England and 1934 England-to-France (15:34). First swimmer to cross English channel in both ways.
Rostislav Vítek CZE SWI 2008 2009 England-to-France (7:16)

Olympian Names

So we got asked what was the most common name for an Olympic athlete, which led to a little research into the names of Olympians.

First off, the answer to that question is Kim, the most common Korean name, with fully 597 Olympians so-named. Kim is followed by the second most common Korean name – Lee, although that name is used in other English-speaking nations as well. There have been 423 Lee Olympians. The remainder of the names used by more than 100 Olympians are as follows:

Name Count
Kim 597
Lee 423
Li 277
Smith 260
Wang 151
Zhang 135
García 119
Andersson 117
González 111
Chen 110
Martin 108
Hansen 104
Liu 103
Park 103
Williams 101
Andersen 100
Singh 100

Smith is the most common Anglo-Saxon name with 260 Olympians, although if we count the variants of Anderson (85) / Andersen (100) / Andersson (117), there are 302 of them. Another name that should be higher on the above list is Singh. Singh is the common male surname for Indian Sikhs, but it is often a compound surname, such as Singh Grewal. If you include all the Singhs with the compounds, there are 186 such Singh Olympians.

So what’s the shortest name of any Olympian. The award goes to North Korean table tennis player O Il who competed at the 2004 Athens Games. His name has only 3 letters. The only 4-letter names are E Jie, a 1992 Chinese female fencer, and Li Na, the well-known female Chinese tennis player. In all, there have been 48 Olympians with a single-letter surname, all vowels, and every vowel is represented, as follows:

Name ###
O 36
U 8
A 2
E 1
I 1

All 48 are from either China, Hong Kong, DPR Korea (North), or Chinese Taipei (Taiwan).

So which Olympian has had the longest name? This is a more difficult question with multiple sub-categories. If we include titles, such as the Duchess of Cambridge, who is not an Olympian, the answer is easy. The longest name belongs to 1920 Spanish polo player Jacobo Fitz-James. Fitz-James has a title, in fact, he has a few titles, or more properly, he’s got a whole slew of them. His title is fully: XVII Duque de Alba de Tormes, 10th Duke of Berwick, Duque de Arjona, XVII Duque de Huescar, X Duque de Liria y Jérica, Duque de Montoro, XIII Conde-Duque de Olivares, Marqués del Carpio, Conde de Baños, Conde de Lemos, Conde de Lerín, Conde de Miranda del Castanar, Conde de Monterrey, Conde de Osorno, Conde de Siruela, Condestable de Navarra, XI Marqués de la Algaba, Marqués de Andrade, Marqués de Ardales, Marqués de Ayala, XIII Marqués de Barcarrota, Marqués de Casarrubios del Monte, XVIII Marqués de Coria, Marqués de Eliche, Marqués de Fuentes de Valdepero, Marqués de Fuentiduena, Marqués de Galve, Marqués de los Gelves, Marqués de Mirallo, Marqués de Modica, Marqués de la Mota, Marqués de Moya, Marqués de Osera, Marqués de Piedrahita, Marqués de Salvatierra, Marqués de San Esteban de Gormaz, Marqués de San Leonardo, Marqués de Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Marqués de Sárria, Marqués de Tarazona, Marqués de Valdunquillo, Marqués de Villalba, Marqués de Villanueva del Fresno, Marqués de Villanueva del Río, 10th Earl of Tinmouth, Vizconde de la Calzada, 10th Baron of Bosworth, Caballero del Orden del Toisón de Oro. Which takes up 1,126 characters – and most of a page on this blog.

So let’s omit titles. Now we have to look at what we term Used Names and Full Names. A Used Name is something like Carl Lewis, while his Full Name is Frederick Carleton “Carl” Lewis. Again we have a problem defining terms – should we include the female athletes with multiple hyphenated married names? If we do, the Olympian with the longest Used Name is Slovakian biathlete Martina Jašicová-Schwarzbacherová-Halinárová – 36 characters long.

If we omit hyphenated names, the longest used names are Patricia Galvin de la Tour d’Auvergne, an American equestrienne from 1960-64, and Jacques De Wykerslooth De Rooyesteyn, a 1924 Belgian modern pentathlete. But Galvin de la Tour d’Auvergne is her name after marriage (she was born Patricia Galvin), so De Wykerslooth De Rooyesteyn becomes the longest Used Name (28 characters).

But looking at non-hyphenated and non-compound names, we have three women with Used Names of 20+ characters, led by the Malagasy swimmer (2004-08) Tojohanitra Andriamanjatoarimanana (22), then the Thai weightlifter (2008) Prapawadee Jaroenrattanatarakoon (21), and finally the 1992 Fijian judoka Asenaca Lesivakaruakitotoiya (20). Among men, the two longest are 1972-76 Indian hockey player Govinda Billimogaputtaswamy (19) and 1948 Greek fencer Nikolaos Khristogiannopoulos (19).

Looking at Full Names, the two longest are two Liechtensteiner alpine skiiers – Max Emanuel Maria Alexander Vicot Bruno de la Santisima Trinidad y Todos los Santos von Hohenlohe Langenburg (107), and Konstantin Franz Nikolaus Karl Heinrich Dagobert Anton von Padua Ildefons Maria von Liechtenstein (96). For the record, their surnames are, respectively, von Hohenlohe Langenburg and von Padua Ildefons Maria von Liechtenstein.

If we again try to be restrictive and omit compound surnames, or those with particles (de, von, etc.), the longest full name belongs to an Austrian shooter from 1952-64 – Ladislaus Peter Maria Gabriel Antonius Benedikt Bonaventura Szapáry (66). The American record belongs to the renowned swimmer Duke Paoa Kahino Makoe Hulikohoa Kahanamoku, with a 42-character name.

So there you have it. Which proves, if nothing else, that its dangerous to ask the OlyMADMen a seemingly simple question about Olympic statistics.

How many LGBT Olympians are there?

With the Gay Games starting next week, and five-time Olympic Champion Ian Thorpe coming out in an interview, we were curious how many LGBT Olympians there are.  While about 2-3% of people identify themselves as homosexual (per this study), Olympic athletes who have are publicly declared this – either before or after their Olympic career – are much rarer than that.

With over 10,000 athletes competing at the Summer Olympics every four years, one could expect around 250 athletes to be lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender (LGBT), assuming the figures of the general population also hold for Olympic athletes.  However, at this point we have only identified 170 LGBT Olympians in total competing since 1896.

Approach

Of course, we are quite certain this number is wrong. Unlike, for example, birth dates or an athlete’s height, sexual preferences are not recorded for any of the competitors. That means that for our figures, we are dependent on athletes publicly “coming out” about their sexuality. And of course, many LGBT athletes will not come out in public, for various good reasons. First of all, disclosing information about your personal life is something many people avoid, homosexual or not.  Furthermore, many athletes compete as youngsters, who may still be discovering their sexuality, or may focus on their sport as they train to achieve their Olympic goals. 

On a darker note, many LGBT athletes may decide to keep their sexual orientation a secret. In many countries, homosexuality is still taboo – or even considered a criminal offense. Even if it has been accepted by the general public, the athlete in question may not feel comfortable coming out to their families or friends. And, finally, the sports world does have a reputation for being “anti-gay”. Especially in male-dominated sports, competitors may be afraid for homophobia or awkward situations in the locker room. Fortunately, this is slowly changing, as evidenced by coming-outs in male sports like basketball, rugby and football (both kinds).

So, how did we compose our list? We’ve used two main sources for this:

Our criteria for inclusion are simple:

  • The athlete needs to have actually competed in the Olympics (excluding alternates, non-starters and Paralympians)
  • Given the sensitivity of the topic, there needs to be clear evidence the athlete was LGBT, such as an interview with the athlete, a known partner, etc.

A number of athletes from the above sources have been excluded for not meeting one of the two inclusion criteria, notably several athletes who were often rumored to be gay without any form of confirmation. Of course, we have almost certainly made errors here (either by including or excluding people), and we apologize upfront for those.

Analysis

The first known LGBT Olympian, who competed in the 1928 Olympics, was German track athlete Otto Peltzer,  later convicted for homosexual acts on several occasions. Since then, the numbers have gradually risen, with 47 known LGBT competitors at the Sydney 2000 Olympics as the highest number to date. Do note that the numbers for more recent Olympics are most likely to rise, as many athletes – like Thorpe – still come out after their competitive career.

Number of LGBT Summer Olympians

Number of LGBT Summer Olympians

The rise in LGBT participation started in the 1980s, which coincides with the organization of the first Gay Games. Initiated by Olympic decathlete Tom Waddell, the Gay Games were founded as the Gay Olympic Games, but the USOC, in protection of the “Olympic” trademark, forced Waddell to change the name shortly before the first edition in 1982, held in San Francisco. The 9th edition is due to open on August 9, in Cleveland, with an estimated 10,000 athletes competing. Waddell, who himself won a gold medal at the 1986 Gay Games, sadly died of AIDS in 1987.

http://gty.im/71496760

The first LGBT Winter Olympian was U.S. figure skater Ronnie Robertson, known for his relationship with actor Tab Hunter. Like at the Summer Olympics, the number has steadily risen, with a peak of 14 in 2006 and 2010.

Number of LGBT Winter Olympians

Number of LGBT Winter Olympians

One finding worth noting is that almost two thirds of the known LGBT Olympians are women (110 out of 170), which is remarkable given the fact that more men than women compete in the Olympics (certainly historically speaking). We do not know why this is. Homosexuality might be more accepted among women (or women athletes) then among men. Or maybe the stereotypical, more masculine, lesbian woman is more likely to to be drawn to sports than the stereotypical more feminine gay man? Or perhaps our sources were more likely to include lesbian athletes?

So, which sports have drawn the most LGBT athletes? Perhaps surprisingly, this is football (that’s soccer to you Americans) with 23 – of which only two men. Two major participant sports, athletics and swimming both have 14 LGBT athletes, while figure skating (perhaps not a surprise) is the most popular winter sport with 13.

It may not be a shock to anybody that virtually all of the LGBT competitors come from Western Europe, North America or Oceania. With 41, the US has the most known LGBT competitors, which is in line with the fact that the United States have by far the largest collection of Olympians within its borders (9000+). Canada has 19, followed by Germany and Netherlands (both 16). Outside of the earlier mentioned zones, there are three Brazilians, one Dominican, one Israeli, a Puerto Rican, five South Africans and a Tongan.

Olympic Successes

Out of the 170 LGBT athletes, 43 have won one or more gold medals. Most successful is the earlier mentioned Ian Thorpe, who claimed five golds, three silvers and a bronze. He is followed by Dutch speed skater Ireen Wüst, who has almost the same tally, but with 4 golds. Famed US diver Greg Louganis also earned four golds, as did Canadian hockey player Jayna Hefford. In total, 93 of the 170 athletes on our list have medaled at least once.

Transgender/Intersexual athletes

A small group of athletes deserves special mention here. These are athletes that were either born with both male and female characteristics (intersexual) or who chose to change their gender through surgery (transgender).

High jumper Dora Ratjen, an intersexual, was (incorrectly) exposed as a man and stripped of her titles. Contemporary sprinter Stanisława Walasiewicz was shot by muggers, revealing her intersexual characteristics decades after her athletic successes. She had coached fellow Polish sprinter Ewa Kłobukowska, who in 1966 failed the then new “sex test”. These tests were always controversial (later editions of the test would have accepted Kłobukowska, for example), and were eventually abolished. This paved the way for Brazilian judoka Edinanci da Silva to compete in women’s judo at four consecutive Olympics.

Sydney 2000 participant Yvonne Buschbaum is the only transgender Olympian known thusfar. After her participation, the pole vaulter underwent surgery, and is now known as Balian Buschbaum.

The full list

Below is a year-by-year list of competitors, starting in 1928 and ending in 2014. As noted before, we do apologize for any incorrect information in this table – please leave a comment if you have a correction. We have tried to be very careful to be certain the athletes are out, as we do not wish to cause any problems for athletes related to their sexuality, and fully respect their privacy.

Athlete Gender NOC Sport Year Season Gold Silver Bronze
Otto Peltzer M GER ATH 1928 S
Otto Peltzer M GER ATH 1932 S
Stanisława Walasiewicz F POL ATH 1932 S 1
Dora Ratjen F GER ATH 1936 S
Stanisława Walasiewicz F POL ATH 1936 S 1
Ernst Van Heerden M RSA ART 1948 S 1
Kin Hoitsma M USA FEN 1956 S
Susan Gray F USA SWI 1956 S
Ronnie Robertson M USA FSK 1956 W 1
Norman Elder M CAN EQU 1960 S
Ewa Kłobukowska F POL ATH 1964 S 1 1
Marion Lay F CAN SWI 1964 S
Ondrej Nepela M TCH FSK 1964 W
Tom Waddell M USA ATH 1968 S
Norman Elder M CAN EQU 1968 S
Karin Janz F GDR GYM 1968 S 1 1
Marion Lay F CAN SWI 1968 S 1
Ondrej Nepela M TCH FSK 1968 W
Scott Cranham M CAN DIV 1972 S
Karin Janz F GDR GYM 1972 S 2 2 1
Peter Prijdekker M NED SWI 1972 S
Mark Chatfield M USA SWI 1972 S
Toller Cranston M CAN FSK 1972 W
John Curry M GBR FSK 1972 W
Ondrej Nepela M TCH FSK 1972 W 1
Gail Marquis F USA BAS 1976 S 1
Scott Cranham M CAN DIV 1976 S
Greg Louganis M USA DIV 1976 S 1
Olivier Rouyer M FRA FTB 1976 S
Betty Baxter F CAN VOL 1976 S
Toller Cranston M CAN FSK 1976 W 1
John Curry M GBR FSK 1976 W 1
Randy Gardner M USA FSK 1976 W
Brian Pockar M CAN FSK 1980 W
Sabine Braun F FRG ATH 1984 S
Beate Peters F FRG ATH 1984 S
Greg Louganis M USA DIV 1984 S 2
Robert Dover M USA EQU 1984 S
Holly Metcalf F USA ROW 1984 S 1
Bruce Hayes M USA SWI 1984 S 1
Rob McCall M CAN FSK 1984 W
Brian Orser M CAN FSK 1984 W 1
Brian Boitano M USA FSK 1984 W
Edel Therese Høiseth F NOR SSK 1984 W
Brian Marshall M CAN ATH 1988 S
Sabine Braun F FRG ATH 1988 S
Beate Peters F FRG ATH 1988 S
Petra Rossner F GDR CYC 1988 S
Craig Rogerson M AUS DIV 1988 S
Patrick Jeffrey M USA DIV 1988 S
Greg Louganis M USA DIV 1988 S 2
Robert Dover M USA EQU 1988 S
Sherry Cassuto F USA ROW 1988 S
Mark Tewksbury M CAN SWI 1988 S 1
Dan Veatch M USA SWI 1988 S
Tine Scheuer-Larsen F DEN TEN 1988 S
Rob McCall M CAN FSK 1988 W 1
Brian Orser M CAN FSK 1988 W 1
Brian Boitano M USA FSK 1988 W 1
Edel Therese Høiseth F NOR SSK 1988 W
Sabine Braun F GER ATH 1992 S 1
Mark Leduc M CAN BOX 1992 S 1
Petra Rossner F GER CYC 1992 S 1
Craig Rogerson M AUS DIV 1992 S
Carl Hester M GBR EQU 1992 S
Blyth Tait M NZL EQU 1992 S 1 1
Robert Dover M USA EQU 1992 S 1
Alyson Annan F AUS HOK 1992 S
Carole Thate F NED HOK 1992 S
Irene de Kok F NED JUD 1992 S 1
Mark Tewksbury M CAN SWI 1992 S 1 1
Conchita Martínez F ESP TEN 1992 S 1
Gigi Fernandez F USA TEN 1992 S 1
Joan Guetschow F USA BIA 1992 W
Edel Therese Høiseth F NOR SSK 1992 W
Geert Blanchart M BEL STK 1992 W
Joan Guetschow F USA BIA 1994 W
Brian Boitano M USA FSK 1994 W
Edel Therese Høiseth F NOR SSK 1994 W
Chris Witty F USA SSK 1994 W
Geert Blanchart M BEL STK 1994 W
Lisa-Marie Vizaniari F AUS ATH 1996 S
Sabine Braun F GER ATH 1996 S
Kajsa Bergqvist F SWE ATH 1996 S
Sheryl Swoopes F USA BAS 1996 S 1
Natalie Cook F AUS BVO 1996 S 1
Michelle Ferris F AUS CYC 1996 S 1
Graeme Obree M GBR CYC 1996 S
Judith Arndt F GER CYC 1996 S 1
Patrick Jeffrey M USA DIV 1996 S
David Pichler M USA DIV 1996 S
Blyth Tait M NZL EQU 1996 S 1 1
Robert Dover M USA EQU 1996 S 1
Guenter Seidel M USA EQU 1996 S 1
Linda Medalen F NOR FTB 1996 S 1
Bente Nordby F NOR FTB 1996 S 1
Pia Sundhage F SWE FTB 1996 S
Lena Videkull F SWE FTB 1996 S
Kris Burley M CAN GYM 1996 S
Camilla Andersen F DEN HAN 1996 S 1
Alyson Annan F AUS HOK 1996 S 1
Carole Thate F NED HOK 1996 S 1
Edinanci da Silva F BRA JUD 1996 S
Daniel Kowalski M AUS SWI 1996 S 1 2
Rennae Stubbs F AUS TEN 1996 S
Conchita Martínez F ESP TEN 1996 S 1
Gigi Fernandez F USA TEN 1996 S 1
Nancy Drolet F CAN ICH 1998 W 1
Jayna Hefford F CAN ICH 1998 W 1
Erika Holst F SWE ICH 1998 W
Ylva Lindberg F SWE ICH 1998 W
Stine Brun Kjeldaas F NOR SNB 1998 W 1
Marieke Wijsman F NED SSK 1998 W
Edel Therese Høiseth F NOR SSK 1998 W
Chris Witty F USA SSK 1998 W 1 1
Lisa-Marie Vizaniari F AUS ATH 2000 S
Sabine Braun F GER ATH 2000 S
Yvonne Buschbaum F GER ATH 2000 S
Kajsa Bergqvist F SWE ATH 2000 S 1
Peter Häggström M SWE ATH 2000 S
Sheryl Swoopes F USA BAS 2000 S 1
Orlando Cruz M PUR BOX 2000 S
Natalie Cook F AUS BVO 2000 S 1
Michelle Ferris F AUS CYC 2000 S 1
Judith Arndt F GER CYC 2000 S
Petra Rossner F GER CYC 2000 S
Ina-Yoko Teutenberg F GER CYC 2000 S
Chris Witty F USA CYC 2000 S
Mathew Helm M AUS DIV 2000 S
David Pichler M USA DIV 2000 S
Carl Hester M GBR EQU 2000 S
Arjen Teeuwissen M NED EQU 2000 S 1
Blyth Tait M NZL EQU 2000 S
Paul O'Brien M NZL EQU 2000 S
Robert Dover M USA EQU 2000 S 1
Guenter Seidel M USA EQU 2000 S 1
Robert Costello M USA EQU 2000 S
Imke Duplitzer F GER FEN 2000 S
Inka Grings F GER FTB 2000 S 1
Steffi Jones F GER FTB 2000 S 1
Bente Nordby F NOR FTB 2000 S 1
Victoria Svensson F SWE FTB 2000 S
Camilla Andersen F DEN HAN 2000 S 1
Lotte Kiærskou F DEN HAN 2000 S 1
Mia Hundvin F NOR HAN 2000 S 1
Alyson Annan F AUS HOK 2000 S 1
Helen Richardson F GBR HOK 2000 S
Kate Walsh F GBR HOK 2000 S
Carole Thate F NED HOK 2000 S 1
Marilyn Agliotti F RSA HOK 2000 S
Edinanci da Silva F BRA JUD 2000 S
Lauren Meece F USA JUD 2000 S
Daniel Kowalski M AUS SWI 2000 S 1
Ian Thorpe M AUS SWI 2000 S 3 2
Francilla Agar F DMA SWI 2000 S
Johan Kenkhuis M NED SWI 2000 S 1
Rennae Stubbs F AUS TEN 2000 S
Conchita Martínez F ESP TEN 2000 S
Amélie Mauresmo F FRA TEN 2000 S
Eleni Daniilidou F GRE TEN 2000 S
Ji Wallace M AUS TMP 2000 S 1
Stacy Sykora F USA VOL 2000 S
Anja Pärson F SWE ASK 2002 W 1 1
Vibeke Skofterud F NOR CCS 2002 W
Jayna Hefford F CAN ICH 2002 W 1
Erika Holst F SWE ICH 2002 W 1
Ylva Lindberg F SWE ICH 2002 W 1
Stine Brun Kjeldaas F NOR SNB 2002 W
Marieke Wijsman F NED SSK 2002 W
Chris Witty F USA SSK 2002 W 1
Rob Newton M GBR ATH 2004 S
Sheryl Swoopes F USA BAS 2004 S 1
Natalie Cook F AUS BVO 2004 S
Leigh-Ann Naidoo F RSA BVO 2004 S
Judith Arndt F GER CYC 2004 S 1
Mathew Helm M AUS DIV 2004 S 1 1
Carl Hester M GBR EQU 2004 S
Blyth Tait M NZL EQU 2004 S
Robert Dover M USA EQU 2004 S 1
Guenter Seidel M USA EQU 2004 S 1
Darren Chiacchia M USA EQU 2004 S 1
Imke Duplitzer F GER FEN 2004 S 1
Sarah Walsh F AUS FTB 2004 S
Steffi Jones F GER FTB 2004 S 1
Victoria Svensson F SWE FTB 2004 S
Abby Wambach F USA FTB 2004 S 1
Angela Hucles F USA FTB 2004 S 1
Lotte Kiærskou F DEN HAN 2004 S 1
Rikke Skov F DEN HAN 2004 S 1
Chantal de Bruijn F NED HOK 2004 S 1
Edinanci da Silva F BRA JUD 2004 S
Ian Thorpe M AUS SWI 2004 S 2 1 1
Dominik Koll M AUT SWI 2004 S
Johan Kenkhuis M NED SWI 2004 S 1
Rennae Stubbs F AUS TEN 2004 S
Conchita Martínez F ESP TEN 2004 S 1
Amélie Mauresmo F FRA TEN 2004 S 1
Eleni Daniilidou F GRE TEN 2004 S
Lisa Raymond F USA TEN 2004 S
Martina Navratilova F USA TEN 2004 S
Stacy Sykora F USA VOL 2004 S
Anja Pärson F SWE ASK 2006 W 1 2
Jeff Buttle M CAN FSK 2006 W 1
Johnny Weir M USA FSK 2006 W
Matt Savoie M USA FSK 2006 W
Ryan O'Meara M USA FSK 2006 W
Jayna Hefford F CAN ICH 2006 W 1
Charlie Labonté F CAN ICH 2006 W 1
Erika Holst F SWE ICH 2006 W 1
Ylva Lindberg F SWE ICH 2006 W 1
Kathleen Kauth F USA ICH 2006 W 1
Caitlin Cahow F USA ICH 2006 W 1
Cheryl Maas F NED SNB 2006 W
Ireen Wüst F NED SSK 2006 W 1 1
Chris Witty F USA SSK 2006 W
Seimone Augustus F USA BAS 2008 S 1
Natalie Cook F AUS BVO 2008 S
Larissa F BRA BVO 2008 S
Judith Arndt F GER CYC 2008 S
Mathew Helm M AUS DIV 2008 S
Matt Mitcham M AUS DIV 2008 S 1
Tom Daley M GBR DIV 2008 S
Hans Peter Minderhoud M NED EQU 2008 S 1
Imke Duplitzer F GER FEN 2008 S
Nadine Angerer F GER FTB 2008 S 1
Linda Bresonik F GER FTB 2008 S 1
Isabell Herlovsen F NOR FTB 2008 S
Victoria Svensson F SWE FTB 2008 S
Hedvig Lindahl F SWE FTB 2008 S
Caroline Seger F SWE FTB 2008 S
Nilla Fischer F SWE FTB 2008 S
Jessica Landström F SWE FTB 2008 S
Robbie Rogers M USA FTB 2008 S
Angela Hucles F USA FTB 2008 S 1
Tasha Kai F USA FTB 2008 S 1
Alexandra Lacrabère F FRA HAN 2008 S
Nina Wörz F GER HAN 2008 S
Katja Nyberg F NOR HAN 2008 S 1
Gro Hammerseng F NOR HAN 2008 S 1
Helen Richardson F GBR HOK 2008 S
Kate Walsh F GBR HOK 2008 S
Beth Storry F GBR HOK 2008 S
Marilyn Agliotti F NED HOK 2008 S 1
Maartje Paumen F NED HOK 2008 S 1
Edinanci da Silva F BRA JUD 2008 S
Vicky Galindo F USA SOF 2008 S 1
Lauren Lappin F USA SOF 2008 S 1
Dominik Koll M AUT SWI 2008 S
Rennae Stubbs F AUS TEN 2008 S
Casey Dellacqua F AUS TEN 2008 S
Eleni Daniilidou F GRE TEN 2008 S
Tzipora Obziler F ISR TEN 2008 S
Jess Harrison F FRA TRI 2008 S
Carole Péon F FRA TRI 2008 S
Stacy Sykora F USA VOL 2008 S 1
Anja Pärson F SWE ASK 2010 W 1
Vibeke Skofterud F NOR CCS 2010 W 1
Barbara Jezeršek F SLO CCS 2010 W
Johnny Weir M USA FSK 2010 W
Jayna Hefford F CAN ICH 2010 W 1
Sarah Vaillancourt F CAN ICH 2010 W 1
Charlie Labonté F CAN ICH 2010 W 1
Erika Holst F SWE ICH 2010 W
Caitlin Cahow F USA ICH 2010 W 1
Callan Chythlook-Sifsof F USA SNB 2010 W
Anastasia Bucsis F CAN SSK 2010 W
Ireen Wüst F NED SSK 2010 W 1
Sanne van Kerkhof F NED STK 2010 W
Blake Skjellerup M NZL STK 2010 W
Karen Hultzer F RSA ARC 2012 S
Nadine Müller F GER ATH 2012 S
Seimone Augustus F USA BAS 2012 S 1
Nicola Adams F GBR BOX 2012 S 1
Natalie Cook F AUS BVO 2012 S
Larissa F BRA BVO 2012 S 1
Judith Arndt F GER CYC 2012 S 1
Ina-Yoko Teutenberg F GER CYC 2012 S
Matt Mitcham M AUS DIV 2012 S
Tom Daley M GBR DIV 2012 S 1
Carl Hester M GBR EQU 2012 S 1
Edward Gal M NED EQU 2012 S 1
Imke Duplitzer F GER FEN 2012 S
Casey Stoney F GBR FTB 2012 S
Portia Modise F RSA FTB 2012 S
Hedvig Lindahl F SWE FTB 2012 S
Caroline Seger F SWE FTB 2012 S
Nilla Fischer F SWE FTB 2012 S
Abby Wambach F USA FTB 2012 S 1
Megan Rapinoe F USA FTB 2012 S 1
Mayssa Pessoa F BRA HAN 2012 S
Rikke Skov F DEN HAN 2012 S
Alexandra Lacrabère F FRA HAN 2012 S
Helen Richardson F GBR HOK 2012 S 1
Kate Walsh F GBR HOK 2012 S 1
Beth Storry F GBR HOK 2012 S 1
Marilyn Agliotti F NED HOK 2012 S 1
Maartje Paumen F NED HOK 2012 S 1
Carlien Dirkse van den Heuvel F NED HOK 2012 S 1
Kim Lammers F NED HOK 2012 S 1
Ari-Pekka Liukkonen M FIN SWI 2012 S
Amini Fonua M TGA SWI 2012 S
Casey Dellacqua F AUS TEN 2012 S
Lisa Raymond F USA TEN 2012 S 1
Jess Harrison F FRA TRI 2012 S
Carole Péon F FRA TRI 2012 S
Barbara Jezeršek F SLO CCS 2014 W
Jayna Hefford F CAN ICH 2014 W 1
Sarah Vaillancourt F CAN ICH 2014 W 1
Charlie Labonté F CAN ICH 2014 W 1
John Fennell M CAN LUG 2014 W
Daniela Iraschko-Stolz F AUT SKJ 2014 W 1
Belle Brockhoff F AUS SNB 2014 W
Cheryl Maas F NED SNB 2014 W
Anastasia Bucsis F CAN SSK 2014 W
Ireen Wüst F NED SSK 2014 W 2 3
Sanne van Kerkhof F NED STK 2014 W