James Snook

Olympic shooter, gold medalist, veterinarian, murderer

Full name       James Howard Snook

Used name    James Snook

Born                   17 September 1879; South Lebanon, Ohio (USA)

Died                   28 February 1930; Columbus, Ohio (USA)

Year-Games Sport Event Finish Medal
1920-Summer Shooting Rapid-Fire Pistol Team 1 Gold
Free Pistol 50 m Team 1 Gold

http://www.sports-reference.com/olympics/athletes/sn/james-snook-1.html
jameshsnook2

James Snook, twice a shooting gold medalist at the 1920 Olympics, made national headlines in 1929 and 1930, but not for anything to do with his shooting ability. Snook was a 1908 graduate of the Ohio State Veterinary School and in 1920 was a professor of veterinary medicine at Ohio State. In June 1929 he was practicing at the Ohio State rifle range when he was arrested and accused of the murder of Theora K. Hix, a medical student at Ohio State.

snookburialfile

It turned out that Snook and Hix had posed as man and wife for three years, sharing an apartment near the school’s campus. On 13 June 1929, Snook claimed that Hix asked him to divorce his wife and marry her, threatening to kill his wife and child if she was refused. Snook confessed to then beating Hix several times with a hammer before severing her jugular vein with a pocket-knife to “relieve her suffering.” On 14 August 1929 a jury deliberated only 28 minutes before finding Snook guilty of first degree murder. A week later he was sentenced to be put to death, and at 7:10 p.m. on 28 February 1930, he died in the electric chair at the Ohio State Penitentiary.

Olympian Heads of State

Which Olympians have been heads of state – such as a President, Prime Minister, or King or Queen? We know of this happening 8 times, as follows:

Athlete NOC Sport Era Notes
Taro Aso JPN SHO 1976 Prime Minister of Japan 2008-09.
Juan Carlos Crown Prince de Borbón ESP SAI 1972 King of Spain 1975-present.
Albert Prince Grimaldi MON BOB 1988-2002 Prince of Monaco 2005-present.
Crown Prince Harald NOR SAI 1964-72 King of Norway 1991-present.
Crown Prince Konstantinos GRE SAI 1960 King of Greece 1964-73.
Crown Prince Olav NOR SAI 1928 King of Norway 1957-91.
Pál Schmitt HUN FEN 1968-76 President of Hungary 2010-12.
Marcus Stephen NRU/SAM WLT 1992-2000 President of Nauru 2007-11.

See also http://www.sports-reference.com/olympics/friv/lists.cgi

Olympic Medals Won by Nations – A Deeper Analysis

Recently I posted about the United States’ dominance of the all-time Olympic medal lists (hey, I’m a Merkan – give me a break). But there are some things that can be analyzed a bit more closely.

Firstly, the United States is the world’s 3rd most populous country, after China and India. It would stand to reason that a country with more people would have a larger pool from which to draw great athletes. The US is also the world’s 3rd (or possibly 4th) largest country, after Russia and Canada, although not certain if that has any effect. (China and the United States are almost the exact same size and sometimes China is listed the 3rd largest nation.)

Secondly, the United States is a wealthy country, with the world’s largest gross domestic product (GDP). Again, a country with great wealth has several advantages in terms of producing great athletes and Olympic medalists. Not only is there more money to support the athletes, theoretically, but people from wealthy nations typically have more leisure time allowing them to train more for sports.

So let’s look at the Olympic medal lists in a couple different ways. Remember that North America and Europe/International analyze medal lists differently – in North America the nations are ranked by 1) medals, 2) gold, 3) silver, and 4) bronze; while in Europe they are ranked by 1) gold, 2) silver, and 3) bronze. So we’ll compare lists both by total medals won and gold medals won (we can’t use silver and bronze well in the analysis that will follow).

Second, a caveat is in order. We are going to eliminate any nations that no longer exists – you’ll see why soon.

We will then look at medals won in terms of 1) medals won per capita, or divided by the nation’s population, to eliminate the advantage gained by larger nations; 2) medals won per GDP, to eliminate the advantage gained by wealthier nations; and 3) medals won per GDP per capita, which is probably a better way to measure a nation’s wealth.

Here is the basic top 25 medal list, uncorrected, with ranks on the left both in US system and the European system:

RankUS RankEur NOC G S B Meds
1 1 United States 1083 863 760 2706
2 2 Soviet Union 473 376 355 1204
3 3 Germany 292 326 312 930
4 4 Great Britain 254 288 287 829
5 6 France 250 265 314 829
6 5 Italy 243 206 231 680
7 8 Sweden 194 210 236 640
8 10 Russia 183 166 179 528
9 7 China 213 166 147 526
10 9 German Demo. Rep. 192 165 162 519
11 13 Australia 144 159 185 488
12 12 Hungary 169 151 170 490
13 11 Norway 174 162 142 478
14 14 Finland 145 147 175 467
15 15 Japan 140 143 160 443
16 16 Canada 122 156 167 445
17 17 The Netherlands 115 125 140 380
18 19 Switzerland 101 116 114 331
19 21 Austria 82 115 119 316
20 20 Romania 88 94 120 302
21 18 Korea (South) 107 99 90 296
22 23 Poland 70 89 132 291
23 24 Fed. Rep. of Germany 67 82 94 243
24 26 Bulgaria 52 87 81 220
25 22 Cuba 71 65 66 202

This is as we noted, with the USA on top, in both systems. We will eliminate the Soviet Union, Federal Republic of Germany (West), German Democratic Republic (East), and other non-extant nations, such as Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia. The reason now becomes more obvious – we are using current figures for population (2014) and gross domestic product (2013), and those figures don’t exist any more for those nations, and there is no good way to extrapolate to them. Here are the population, GDP, and GDP per capita figures (Source: US CIA Factbook) for the top 25 nations on the “raw” medal list:

NOC Population GDP GDP PC Status
United States 318892103 $16720000 $52800
Soviet Union NLE
Germany 80996685 $3593000 $39500
Great Britain 63742977 $2490000 $37300
France 66259012 $2739000 $35700
Italy 61680122 $2068000 $29600
Sweden 9723809 $552000 $40900
Russia 142470272 $2113000 $18100
China 1355692576 $9330000 $9800
German Democratic Republic NLE
Australia 22507617 $1488000 $43000
Hungary 9919128 $130600 $19800
Norway 5147792 $515800 $55400
Finland 5268799 $259600 $35900
Japan 127103388 $5007000 $37100
Canada 34834841 $1825000 $43100
The Netherlands 16877351 $800500 $41400
Switzerland 8061516 $646200 $46000
Austria 8223062 $417900 $42600
Romania 21729871 $188900 $13200
Korea (South) 49039986 $1198000 $33200
Poland 38346279 $513900 $21100
Federal Republic of Germany NLE
Bulgaria 6924716 $53700 $14400
Cuba 11047251 $72300 $10200

NLE=No Longer Exists

Here is what happens if we look at medals and gold medals per million population:

Rank NOC Meds Meds/Pop
1 Liechtenstein 9 241.203
2 Norway 478 92.855
3 Finland 467 88.635
4 Sweden 640 65.818
5 Hungary 490 49.400
6 Switzerland 331 41.059
7 Austria 316 38.429
8 The Bahamas 12 37.286
9 Denmark 185 33.219
10 Estonia 40 31.798
11 Bulgaria 220 31.770
12 New Zealand 101 22.945
13 Jamaica 67 22.867
14 The Netherlands 380 22.515
15 Australia 488 21.682
16 Cuba 202 18.285
17 Slovenia 34 17.100
18 Belgium 155 14.833
19 Trinidad & Tobago 18 14.707
20 Bermuda 1 14.319
21 Romania 302 13.898
22 Greece 144 13.364
23 Great Britain 829 13.005
24 Canada 445 12.775
25 Iceland 4 12.604
Rank NOC Gold Gold/Pop
1 Liechtenstein 2 53.601
2 Norway 174 33.801
3 Finland 145 27.521
4 Sweden 194 19.951
5 Hungary 169 17.038
6 The Bahamas 5 15.536
7 Switzerland 101 12.529
8 Estonia 13 10.335
9 Austria 82 9.972
10 New Zealand 42 9.541
11 Grenada 1 9.078
12 Denmark 46 8.260
13 Bulgaria 52 7.509
14 The Netherlands 115 6.814
15 Cuba 71 6.427
16 Australia 144 6.398
17 Jamaica 17 5.802
18 Romania 88 4.050
19 Great Britain 254 3.985
20 Italy 243 3.940
21 Belgium 41 3.924
22 Luxembourg 2 3.841
23 France 250 3.773
24 Germany 292 3.605
25 Greece 38 3.526

One thing of note above – the top nations are predominately winter sports nations. Liechtenstein, in particular, owes all of its medals to two winter sports families – the Wenzels and the Frommelts. Also, if you look at the two lists above, they are quite similar when using both ranking systems.

Now let’s look at how the nations do if we compare medals won per GDP, in million $:

Rank NOC Meds Meds/GDP
1 Jamaica 67 4656.011
2 Bulgaria 220 4096.834
3 Hungary 490 3751.914
4 Cuba 202 2793.914
5 Mongolia 24 2154.399
6 Tonga 1 2096.436
7 Kenya 86 1898.036
8 Finland 467 1798.921
9 Liechtenstein 9 1760.219
10 Korea DPR (North) 49 1750.000
11 Estonia 40 1647.446
12 Romania 302 1598.729
13 Georgia 25 1567.398
14 The Bahamas 12 1433.178
15 Belarus 91 1314.269
16 Grenada 1 1233.046
17 Sweden 640 1159.420
18 Armenia 12 1153.846
19 Ethiopia 45 950.570
20 Norway 478 926.716
21 Moldova 7 882.501
22 Latvia 26 855.826
23 Zimbabwe 8 763.359
24 Austria 316 756.162
25 Slovenia 34 726.185
Rank NOC Gold Gold/GDP
1 Hungary 169 1294.028
2 Grenada 1 1233.046
3 Jamaica 17 1181.376
4 Cuba 71 982.019
5 Bulgaria 52 968.343
6 The Bahamas 5 597.158
7 Finland 145 558.552
8 Kenya 25 551.755
9 Estonia 13 535.420
10 Korea DPR (North) 14 500.000
11 Romania 88 465.855
12 Ethiopia 21 443.599
13 Liechtenstein 2 391.160
14 Georgia 6 376.176
15 Burundi 1 373.692
16 Sweden 194 351.449
17 Norway 174 337.340
18 Zimbabwe 3 286.260
19 Belarus 18 259.965
20 New Zealand 42 231.916
21 Surinam 1 199.641
22 The Ukraine 35 199.430
23 Austria 82 196.219
24 Mongolia 2 179.533
25 Croatia 10 169.090

Again, the lists are similar, although Jamaica leads in terms of medals won per capita while Hungary leads in terms of gold medals won per capita. But Jamaica, Bulgaria, Cuba, and Hungary are in the top 5 on both systems.

Finally, looking at the medal lists in terms of GDP per $1,000 per capita:

Rank NOC Meds Meds/GDPPC
1 China 526 53.673
2 United States 2706 51.250
3 Kenya 86 47.778
4 Ethiopia 45 37.500
5 Russia 528 29.171
6 Korea DPR (North) 49 27.222
7 Hungary 490 24.747
8 Germany 930 23.544
9 France 829 23.221
10 Italy 680 22.973
11 Romania 302 22.879
12 Great Britain 829 22.225
13 Cuba 202 19.804
14 The Ukraine 122 16.486
15 Sweden 640 15.648
16 Bulgaria 220 15.278
17 Poland 291 13.791
18 Zimbabwe 8 13.333
19 Finland 467 13.008
20 Japan 443 11.941
21 Australia 488 11.349
22 Canada 445 10.325
23 The Netherlands 380 9.179
24 Brazil 108 8.926
25 Korea (South) 296 8.916
Rank NOC Gold Gold/GDPPC
1 China 213 21.735
2 United States 1083 20.511
3 Ethiopia 21 17.500
4 Kenya 25 13.889
5 Russia 183 10.110
6 Hungary 169 8.535
7 Italy 243 8.209
8 Korea DPR (North) 14 7.778
9 Germany 292 7.392
10 France 250 7.003
11 Cuba 71 6.961
12 Great Britain 254 6.810
13 Romania 88 6.667
14 Zimbabwe 3 5.000
15 Sweden 194 4.743
16 The Ukraine 35 4.730
17 Finland 145 4.039
18 Japan 140 3.774
19 Bulgaria 52 3.611
20 Australia 144 3.349
21 Poland 70 3.318
22 Korea (South) 107 3.223
23 Norway 174 3.141
24 Canada 122 2.831
25 The Netherlands 115 2.778

Again, many of the “standard” powerful Olympic nations come out on top by this analysis – with China 1st and the United States 2nd. The main reason for this is that while population and GDP differ by several magnitudes among nations, there is not the same magnitude of difference in terms of GDP per capita, which varies from $102,100 per person for Qatar, down to about $1,000 for the very poor nations. But many of those nations have never won an Olympic medal.

The Oldest Olympians

(Note: The below is from Paul Tchir, aka Canadian Paul, one of our group of OlyMADMen. Paul’s specialty is looking at the oldest Olympians, by sport, by medals, by nation, and almost every permutation thereof, and he is absolutely the world’s expert on this topic. You can find his specific page related to this at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Canadian_Paul/Olympics.)

The recent death of American sport shooter Walter Walsh, the longest-lived Olympian, meant that the mantle of “oldest living Olympian” passed to a new title-holder. This distinction went, almost certainly, to Swiss artist Hans Erni, who competed in the art competitions at the 1948 Summer Olympics. Born on 21 February 1909 in Lucrene, Erni achieved international fame as a painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and ceramist and is, as of 9 July 2014, the third longest-lived Olympian of all time, behind Walsh (who was less than a week shy of his 107th birthday at his death) and American gymnast Rudolf Schrader, the latter of whom competed at the 1904 Summer Olympics and died in January 1981 at the age of 105 years, 307 days. Although there are a handful of Olympians older than Erni whose death has not been confirmed, it seems unlikely that someone would have reached 105 years of age in the era of the internet and escaped any notice whatsoever.

As art competitions were removed from the program after 1948, however, this answer may not satisfy everyone. The oldest Olympian from an athletic competition known to be living is Guo Jie of China, who took part in the men’s discus throw at the 1936 Summer Olympics. Guo, born 16 January 1912 in Dalian, is his nation’s longest-lived competitor, the last member of its delegation to the 1936 Games, and was still physically active at his 102nd birthday. He is one of seven Olympic centenarians known to be living, a list that includes:

  • Swedish diver Ingeborg Sjöqvist, born 19 April 1912, who took part in the 1932 and 1936 Summer Olympics and was runner-up in platform diving at the 1931 and 1934 European Championships.
  • American athlete Simone Schaller, born 22 August 1912, who participated in the 80 m hurdles tournament in 1932 and 1936 and is the longest-lived American female Olympian.
  • Baron Eduard von Falz-Fein, born 14 September 1912, who represented Liechtenstein in bobsled at the 1936 Winter Olympics and is second behind Norway’s Hans Kleppen, who died in April 2009 at the age of 102 years, 27 days, among the longest-lived Winter Olympians.
  • Sándor Tarics, born 23 September 1913, who was a member of Hungary’s gold medal-winning water polo team in 1936 and is confirmed as the oldest living Olympic champion (the longest-lived Olympic champion is James Stillman Rockefeller, who died in August 2004 at the age of 102 years, 63 days).
  • Evelyn Furtsch, born 17 April 1914, who earned a gold medal with the United States’ 4x100m relay team in 1932 and, earlier this year, surpassed Britain’s Godfrey Rampling as the longest-lived Olympic track and field gold medalist.

Three more Olympians will hopefully join them by the end of 2014: Olga Tőrös (born 4 August 1914), who won a bronze medal for Hungary in women’s team gymnastics in 1936, American John Lysak (born 16 August 1914), who competed in canoeing that same year, and Helen Johns (born 25 September 1914), who won a gold medal with the American team in the 4×100 m freestyle swimming event in 1932. Also worthy of mention is athlete Mien Klaver, born 26 February 1911, who was an alternate for the Dutch team in Furtsch’s event.

Outside of centenarians, Carla Marangoni (born 13 November 1915) is notable as the last known survivor of the 1928 Summer Olympics: she won a silver medal for Italy in the team gymnastics competition that year. Moreover, due to the increased attention that they receive, it is also possible to produce a definitive list of the seven oldest Olympic champions:

Athlete DOB Gdr NOC Spt Yr
Sándor Tarics 23 September 1913 M HUN WAP 1936
Evelyn Furtsch 17 April 1914 F USA ATH 1932
Helen Johns 25  September 1914 F USA SWI 1932
Durward Knowles 2 November 1917 M BAH SAI 1964
Martin Lundström 30  May 1918 M SWE CCS 1948
Adolph Kiefer 27 June 1918 M USA SWI 1936
Jack Günthard 8 January 1920 M SUI GYM 1952

Notes:

  • Durward Knowles also won bronze in 1956 and competed in 1948, 1952, 1960, 1968, 1972, and 1988. He originally competed for GBR in 1948.
  • Martin Lundström won two golds in 1948 and also bronze in 1952.
  • Jack Günthard also won a silver in 1952.

(Note: This is a difficult topic because it is always hard to know if somebody is definitely alive. If any astute readers have information on Olympians over 90 years old, or older Olympians who have recently died, please contact us via this blog.)

Olympic Cyclists and the Tour de France

Olympic cycling is popular but the greatest race in cycling is considered to be the Tour de France, held every July over 3 weeks, and being held at the moment. A number of top cyclists competed in both the Olympics and Tour de France in the amateur era (1896-1992), and now that professional cyclists are allowed in the Olympics, many of them also compete in the Tour.

Until 1996, among the top professional cyclists who have starred in the Tour de France, only a few had Olympic experience.  Three-time winner Philippe Thys (BEL-1913/14/20) never competed in the Olympics, nor did Fausto Coppi (ITA-1949/52), Louison Bobet (FRA-1953/54/55), nor Bernard Hinault (FRA-1978/79/81/82/85).

The first Olympic medalist to win the Tour was Octave Lapize, who won a bronze medal in the 1908 Olympics 100 km race, and then won the 1910 Tour. Lapize is best known from comments he made in the 1910 Tour. While ascending the Col du Tourmalet, one of the first epic climbs included in the race, he shouted at race organizers, “Vous êtes des assassins! Oui, des assassins!” That stage was over 300 km with 7 difficult climbs, all raced in a single fixed-gear. Lapize was later killed in World War I.

Eddy Merckx (BEL-1969/70/71/72/74), usually considered the greatest cyclist ever, did compete in the 1964 Olympics in the individual road race, finishing 12th, which was won by Italian Mario Zanin. His son, Axel, later competed in the 2000 and 2004 road race, winning an Olympic bronze medal in 2004, but he never featured at the Tour.

Jacques Anquetil (FRA-1957/61/62/63/64), whose record of five wins was later equalled by Merckx, Hinault, and Miguel Induráin (and initially bettered by Lance Armstrong), competed in the 1952 Olympic individual road race, oddly also finishing 12th.  But Anquetil did win an Olympic medal, having been a member of the French team in the road race, which finished third in the overall team event.

The first Olympic gold medalist to have also won the Tour de France is Joop Zoetemelk (NED).  Zoetemelk won his gold medal in the 1968 104 kilometre team time trial as a member of the Dutch team.  At 34 years of age, he won his Tour de France in 1980 and, amazingly, in 1985, aged 39 years, he won the world professional road race championship, the oldest ever to achieve that feat.

The feat of winning the Olympic individual road race and the world professional road race was first achieved by Hennie Kuiper (NED), who won his Olympic gold in 1972 and took the world professional title in 1975.  Kuiper also finished second in the Tour de France twice. This was later done by Italian Paolo Bettini, who won gold in the 2004 Olympic road race and won the World Road Race Championship in 2006-07.

Greg LeMond (USA-1986/89/90), the first American to win the Tour de France and the world professional road race championship (1983/89), qualified for the United States Olympic team in 1980, but as a member of that ill-fated 1980 team, did not compete in the Olympics. Based on his performance at the 1979 World Amateur Championships, winning 3 medals, including the U23 road race gold medal, he was expected to be co-favorite in the road race with Soviet rider Sergey Sukhoruchenkov, but in LeMond’s absence, Sukhoruchenkov won the gold medal.

The following Olympic cycling medalists also won the Tour de France:

Athlete NOC Olympic Medals TdF Title(s)
Jacques Anquetil FRA 1952 Team RR (B) 1957/1961-64.
Lance Armstrong USA 2000 ITT (B) (removed) 1999-05 (removed)
Chris Froome GBR 2012 ITT (B) 2013
Miguel Induráin ESP 1996 ITT (G) 1991-95
Octave Lapize FRA 1908 100 km (B) 1910
Jan Ullrich GER 2000 ITT (G)/IndRR (S) 1997
Bradley Wiggins GBR 2000-12 – 7 medals (4/1/2) 2012
Joop Zoetemelk NED 1968 TTT (G) 1980

USA Dominance at the Olympics

The United States’ first government came into being 240 years ago – in September 1774, with the formation of the 1st Continental Congress. But Americans celebrate the nations’ birthday on July 4th, the day chosen to commemorate the signing of the Declaration of Independence from Great Britain, although it is well known that the signing actually occurred on July 2, 1776. Nonetheless this is what we consider the United States’ birthday – so Happy Birthday, USA. (Yes, I am a USA-ian, and I approved this post)

The United States has also competed at every Olympic Games except for, sadly, the 1980 Olympics in Moscow. During that time, the USA has dominated the medal lists and the medal standings more than any other nation, mainly at the Summer Olympics. There have been pretenders to attempt to usurp that dominance – the USSR from 1952-88, the GDR from 1972-88, and now China threatens to lead the medal standings. But overall, from 1896-2014, Summer alone, Summer and Winter, men, women, it matters not. The USA has been the dominant nation at the Olympic Games in terms of medals won.

Here are the top 5 nations in terms of all medals won, actually listing 6 nations, because North American and Europe tend to count the medal lists differently, and there is a discrepancy, even at the top of the lists (USA uses totals, gold, silver, bronze for the rankings; Europe / International uses gold, silver, bronze for the rankings) (Note: these numbers are all per the IOC standards, meaning they do not include the 1906 Olympics):

RkUS RkEU NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 1 United States 1071 857 754 2682
2 2 Soviet Union 473 376 355 1204
3 3 Germany 288 320 307 915
4 4 Great Britain 246 277 282 805
5 6 France 235 256 298 789
6 5 Italy 236 200 228 664

So skipping the Soviet Union, which no longer exists, the USA has won more gold medals than the next 4 best nations that are still extant, and more medals than the next 3 best nations, however you rank them.

Just looking at the Summer Olympics, that dominance becomes even more impressive.

RkUS RkEU NOC Gold Silver Bronze Totals
1 1 United States 975 754 669 2398
2 2 Soviet Union 395 319 296 1010
3 3 Great Britain 235 271 266 772
4 5 Germany 201 235 249 685
5 4 France 204 225 251 680
6 7 Italy 199 166 185 550

Again, skipping the USSR, the United States has won more gold medals than the next best 4 nations, and more medals than the next best 3 nations. Including the Soviet Union, the USA has won more gold medals and medals than the next best 3 nations at the Summer Olympics.

If we try to split this up by gender, the dominance remains. Here are the lists for men, women, and mixed medals:

Men

RkUS RkEU NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 1 United States 761 591 520 1872
2 2 Soviet Union 323 259 228 810
3 5 France 171 195 217 583
4 4 Great Britain 172 193 194 559
5 6 Germany 171 190 190 551
6 3 Italy 188 157 168 513

Women

RkUS RkEU NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 1 United States 277 222 202 701
2 2 Soviet Union 122 96 113 331
3 3 China 120 100 83 303
4 5 Germany 88 115 97 300
5 4 German DR 94 84 63 241
6 6 Russia 72 83 63 218

Mixed

RkUS RkEU NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 1 United States 33 44 32 109
2 2 Great Britain 31 27 24 82
3 5 France 27 20 27 74
4 3 Germany 29 15 20 64
5 4 Soviet Union 28 21 14 63

The male dominance for the USA is as complete, with more gold medals than the next 4 remaining nations, and more medals than the 3 next nations still extant. The female dominance is less so, as the Soviet Union and German Democratic Republic (GDR – East Germany) emphasized women’s medals during their existence. And it is even less dramatic for mixed events, where it is approached by several other nations, but the USA still leads the mixed medal lists, both in terms of medals won and gold medals won.

Now at the Winter Olympics, the USA is not #1, that honor still going to Norway, with the United States 2nd, Germany 3rd, and Austria 4th. But if we look only at the Summer Olympics, here is how the medal standings have ended up at each Games:

Year NOC G S B Tot RkUS RkEU
1896 Greece 10 16 19 45 1 2
1896 United States 11 7 2 20 2 1
1900 France 28 41 38 107 1 1
1904 United States 78 79 82 239 1 1
1906 France 15 9 16 40 1 1
1908 Great Britain 55 49 34 138 1 1
1912 Sweden 23 24 17 64 1 2
1912 United States 25 18 20 63 2 1
1920 United States 41 26 26 93 1 1
1924 United States 45 27 27 99 1 1
1928 United States 22 18 16 56 1 1
1932 United States 40 33 30 103 1 1
1936 Germany 33 26 30 89 1 1
1948 United States 38 27 19 84 1 1
1952 United States 40 19 17 76 1 1
1956 Soviet Union 37 29 32 98 1 1
1960 Soviet Union 43 29 31 103 1 1
1964 Soviet Union 30 31 35 96 1 2
1964 United States 36 26 28 90 2 1
1968 United States 45 28 34 107 1 1
1972 Soviet Union 50 27 22 99 1 1
1976 Soviet Union 49 41 35 125 1 1
1980 Soviet Union 80 69 46 195 1 1
1984 United States 83 61 30 174 1 1
1988 Soviet Union 55 31 46 132 1 1
1992 Unified Team 45 38 29 112 1 1
1996 United States 44 32 25 101 1 1
2000 United States 37 24 32 93 1 1
2004 United States 36 41 26 101 1 1
2008 United States 36 38 36 110 1 2
2008 China 51 21 28 100 2 1
2012 United States 46 29 29 104 1 1

So of the above 32 leaders (by either system), the USA has been the leading nation at the Summer Olympics 17 times, or more than all other nations combined. However, if one looks at 1956-88, you can see that the Soviet Union was quite dominant in that era. What if they had competed before 1952 or since 1988?

One can argue that Russia, China, and Germany have not existed for as long as the United States, in Olympic terms. So let’s compare numbers against Pan-Soviet (USSR 1952-88 and all former Soviet republics prior to 1952 and since 1992) and Pan-Germania (Germany, East and West Germany) (Note: The Saar also competed in 1952 but did not win any medals.). We really can’t do the same for China. And this tabulation will give an advantage to Pan-Soviet counts, because since 1992 they can have far more than 3 competitors, or 1 team, in an event. The same was true for East and West Germany from 1968-88.

Here are the numbers for all Olympic medals:

NOC Gold Silver Bronze Total
United States 1071 857 754 2682
Soviet Union 473 376 355 1204
Russia 183 166 179 528
Unified Team 54 44 37 135
Ukraine 35 28 59 122
Belarus 18 28 45 91
Kazakhstan 17 20 22 59
Estonia 13 11 16 40
Azerbaijan 6 5 15 26
Latvia 3 15 8 26
Georgia 6 5 14 25
Uzbekistan 6 5 11 22
Lithuania 6 5 10 21
Armenia 1 2 9 12
Moldova 0 2 5 7
Kyrgyzstan 0 1 2 3
Tajikistan 0 1 2 3
Pan-Soviet 821 714 789 2324
Germany 288 320 307 915
German Demo. Rep. 192 165 162 519
Fed. Rep. Germany 67 82 94 243
Pan-Germania 547 567 563 1677

So even with the advantage Pan-Soviet and Pan-Germania get from extra competitors and teams, the USA still leads the medal lists comfortably. Of course, Pan-Soviet had only a few competitors from 1912-36 – Russia in 1912 and the Baltics from 1924-36 – but given how much fewer events there were in that era, the USA would still lead the lists.

Happy Birthday, America. We have a national anthem, The Star-Spangled Banner, which I’ve considered like our alma mater, but I much prefer what could be considered similar to our college fight song – The Stars and Stripes Forever (officially the USA National March since 1987). Here’s one of my favorite versions of it:

Lou Zamperini

Olympic distance runner, War hero, Prison camp survivor, Legend

Category Data
Full Name Louis Silvie "Lou" Zamperini
Used Name Lou Zamperini
Born 26 January 1917; Olean New York (USA)
Died 2 July 2014
Measurements 180 cm / 60 kg
Games Sport Event Status Team Pos Details
1936 (summer) Athletics 5,000 metres Olympic 8

Lou Zamperini was a high school star distance runner in Southern California in the 1930s, and competed in the 1936 Olympics shortly after graduating from high school. He was a solid distance runner, winning a state high school championship and attending Southern Cal on a track scholarship, but his life after athletics is far more interesting.

Lou Zamperini2

Zamperini enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps in 1941, and was deployed to Hawaii as a bombardier. On 27 May 1943, his aircraft went down due to mechanical problems. Only Zamperini and the pilot, Russ Philips, survived. At home, all crew members were presumed dead, and Zamperini’s obituary appeared in US newspapers. However, Zamperini and his two crewmen managed to get out of the wreck of their B-24 and climbed into lifeboats. After 47 days, eating sharks and albatrosses, they were rescued by a Japanese fisherman near the Marshall Islands. By that time, one of them had died.

They were arrested when brought to shore, and were moved from island to island, eventually landing in a prisoner-of-war camp in Japan in September 1943. For two years, Zamperini barely survived the reign of terror of Matsuhiro “The Bird” Watanabe, one of the most notorious Japanese guards during World War II. When released in 1945, he met a New York Times reporter. Telling him his name, the reporter failed to believe Zamperini, as he had read about his death. Zamperini managed to convince him with a university card, one of the few possessions he had after two years of imprisonment. The remarkable story made headlines at home, where he received a hero’s welcome.

After the war, Zamperini began a new career as a Christian motivational speaker. One of his favorite themes is “forgiveness”, and he has spoken several times in Japan to former war criminals, several of whom had tortured him as a prisoner-of-war. Zamperini was given the honour of carrying the Olympic Flame three times: in 1984, 1996 and 1998. At the latter occasion, the Nagano Winter Olympics, he returned to Japan for the first time since 1945. Briefly before the Olympics, it was discovered that Watanabe was still alive as well, but a meeting with him was blocked by the Watanabe family. Zamperini wrote (with David Rensin) a book about his life and experiences, entitled Devil at My Heels. In 2010, well-known author Laura Hillebrand wrote his biography, Unbroken, in far more detail. A movie based on the Hillebrand book is in the works, being directed by Angelina Jolie.

Personal Bests: 880y – 1:53.2 (1938); 1500 – 3:52.6 (1939); Mile – 4:08.3 (1938); 2 miles – 9:12.8 (1939); 5000 – 14:46.8 (1936).

Richard Schoemaker

Fencer, Soldier, Resistance fighter, Martyr, Sachsenhausen

Category Data
Full Name Richard Leonard Arnold Schoemaker
Used Name Richard Schoemaker
Born 5 October 1886; Roermond (NED)
Died 3 May 1942; Sachsenhausen; Oranienburg; Brandenburg (GER)
Year-Season Sport Event Finish
1908 Summer Fencing Individual Sabre =3 Pool 1 Round 2/4

Richard Schoemaker studied at the Royal Netherlands Military Academy, beginning there as a cadet in 1905. In the year he graduated he competed at the Olympic Games in London. Schoemaker then left for the Dutch East Indies as a second lieutenant, being promoted to captain 1915. He left the Army just after World War I, and became a professor of constructional engineering at the Technical Academy in Bandoeng, before returning to the Netherlands where he served as a professor of architecture on the faculty of bouwkunde (architecture/structural engineering) at the Technical University in Delft. He continued as a reserve major in the Army and over the next 20 years helped design and construct several Army barracks. Schoemaker’s brother, Wolff, was a noted Dutch architect often called the Frank Lloyd Wright of Indonesia.
schoemaker
At the start of World War II Schoemaker was called to serve with the Technical Corps of Engineering but was not involved in combat. After the Dutch Army surrendered to the Germans he joined the Dutch Underground, later becoming part of the Ordedienst (OD), a fusion of several underground groups. On 2 May 1941 Schoemaker was arrested after being found to be a member of the OD. He and several other OD members were kept in the state prison in Scheveningen, later called the Oranjehotel. In March-April 1942 Schoemaker and many of his compatriots were tried in Amersfoort, and all were found guilty, with the sentence being death.

On 1 May 1942 the convicted OD members, among whom was included Pierre Versteegh, a Dutch equestrian Olympian, were taken by train to Oranienburg, near Berlin, and then transported by truck to the Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp. On 3 May 1942 all of the convicts were executed by firing squad, in groups of 12 each. Richard Schoemaker was among them. On 3 May 1946 a monument was erected in the Netherlands in the group’s honor. Schoemaker posthumously was given the Resistance Cross for his efforts.

Golden Slams in Tennis

In some sports an Olympic title can be part of a greater achievement. In this blog we’ve already featured ice hockey’s Triple Gold Club and basketball’s Triple Crown winners but tennis also has its’ ultimate challenge – the Golden Slam.
The Golden slam consists of winning the 4 major championships, the Australian, French and US Opens as well as Wimbledon and an Olympic gold medal. It was never achieved during tennis’s original tenure as an Olympic sport (because of the French tournament being restricted to members of French clubs before 1925) but, since the sport returned to the Olympic fold in 1988, a dozen men and women have performed the feat in a mixture of singles and doubles.

Men’s singles

Athlete Nation(s) Olympics Australia French Wimbledon USA
Andre Agassi USA 1996 4 wins 1 win 1 win 2 wins
Rafael Nadal ESP 2008 1 win 9 wins 2 wins 2 wins

Men’s doubles

Athlete Nation(s) Olympics Australia French Wimbledon USA
Bob Bryan USA 2012 6 wins 2 wins 3 wins 4 wins
Mike Bryan USA 2012 6 wins 2 wins 3 wins 4 wins
Daniel Nestor CAN 2000 1 win 4 wins 2 wins 1 win
Todd Woodbridge AUS 1996 3 wins 1 win 9 wins 3 wins
Mark Woodforde AUS 1996 2 wins 1 win 6 wins 3 wins

Women’s singles

Athlete Nation(s) Olympics Australia French Wimbledon USA
Steffi Graf FRG/GER 1988 4 wins 6 wins 7 wins 5 wins
Serena Williams USA 2012 5 wins 2 wins 5 wins 5 wins

Steffi Graf (right of picture)

Women’s doubles

Athlete Nation(s) Olympics Australia French Wimbledon USA
Gigi Fernandez PUR/USA 1992/1996 2 wins 6 wins 4 wins 5 wins
Pam Shriver USA 1988 7 wins 3 wins 5 wins 5 wins
Serena Williams USA 2000/2008/2012 4 wins 2 wins 5 wins 2 wins
Venus Williams USA 2000/2008/2012 4 wins 2 wins 5 wins 2 wins

Williams sisters

Mixed doubles
Closest approach which includes an Olympic title is that of Vika Azarenko and Max Mirnyi of Belarus with Olympic, Wimbledon and US Open titles and an appearance in the final at the Australian Open.
Daniela Hantuchová has won all 4 major titles but did not compete in the event at the 2012 Olympics.

Serena Williams is unique in achieving this feat as both a singles and doubles player and has a record 34 wins across all five championships and both disciplines. Steffi Graf is the only player to win all 5 tournaments in the same calendar year whilst the Bryan brothers have also held all 5 titles at the same time although, in their case, it was spread over 2012 and 2013. Two of the premiere players of recent years, Roger Federer and Maria Sharapova, still need an Olympic singles gold to complete their set.

100 Years Ago Today

On 28 June 1914, 100 years ago today, the inciting incident which led to World War I, occurred. This was the assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand by Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, Bosnia. World War I is considered to have officially started one month later, 28 July, when Austro-Hungary officially declared war on Serbia.

Although there had been only 5 celebrations of the Olympic Games to that date (6 if you count 1906), many of the Olympic athletes served in the military during the war and some of them did not return.

Canadian doctor-soldier John McCrae penned the poem “In Flanders Fields” in memory of the brave men who lost their lives in what has been called The Great War, as if any war could be great. McCrae wrote:

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

In their memory, here are the 132 Olympians that we have been able to identify as being killed, died, or missing in action as a result of World War I. RIP.

Olympian NOC Sport Era Fate
Andrey Akimov RUS FTB 1912 †1916. Killed during World War I.
Gordon Alexander GBR FEN 1912 †24 April 1917. Killed in action during World War I.
Laurie Anderson GBR ATH 1912 †9 November 1914. Killed in action while serving with the Cheshire Regiment.
William Anderson GBR ATH 1906 †April 1915. Killed in action in France.
Henry Ashington GBR ATH 1912 †31 January 1917. Killed in action in France.
Louis Bach FRA FTB 1900 †16 September 1914. Killed in action.
Fritz Bartholomae GER ROW 1912 †12 September 1915. Killed in action during World War I.
Georg Baumann RUS WRE 1912 Missing-in-action during World War I but date and place not known.
Béla Békessy HUN FEN 1912 †6 July 1916. Killed in action during World War I.
Isaac Bentham GBR WAP 1912 †15 May 1917. Killed in action during Battle of Arras.
Renon Boissière FRA ATH 1912 †25 September 1915. Killed in action in World War I.
Henri Bonnefoy FRA SHO 1908 †19 August 1914. Killed in action during World War I.
Hermann von Bönninghausen GER ATH 1908-12 †26 January 1919. Died from wounds from being shot in the face in World War I.
Hermann Bosch GER FTB 1912 †16 July 1916. Killed in action in World War I.
Jean Bouin FRA ATH 1908-12 †29 September 1914. Killed in action by friendly fire.
Hanns Braun GER ATH 1908-12 †9 October 1918. Died as a fighter pilot near Saint-Quentin; Aisne; France in World War I.
Karl Braunsteiner AUT FTB 1912 †19 April 1916. Died as a prisoner of war.
Kurt Bretting GER SWI 1912 †30 May 1918. Killed in action during World War I.
Heinrich Burkowitz GER ATH 1912 †November 1918. Missing in action in November 1918 somewhere in Belgium.
Edmund Bury GBR RAQ 1908 †5 December 1915. With the 11th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps he was killed in action in France during World War I and is buried in Rue-Petillon Military Cemetery in Fleurbaix.
George Butterfield GBR ATH 1908 †24 September 1917. Killed in action in France.
Oswald Carver GBR ROW 1908 †7 June 1915. With the 1st/2nd East Lancashire Royal Engineers he was killed in action in Turkey in World War I and is buried in the Lancashire Landing Cemetery.
Joseph Caullé FRA ATH 1912 †1 October 1915. Killed in action during World War I.
Ralph Chalmers GBR FEN 1908 †8 May 1915. Killed in action during World War I.
Noel Chavasse GBR ATH 1908 †4 August 1917. He is one of only three men to have been awarded a bar to the Victoria Cross. Serving as a captain in the RAMC he was first awarded the VC in 1916 and a bar posthumously in 1917.
Geoffrey Coles GBR SHO 1908 †27 January 1916. Killed in action during World War I.
André Corvington HAI FEN 1900 †13 December 1918. Killed in action in World War I near Reims.
Percy Courtman GBR SWI 1908-12 †2 June 1917. Part of 6th Battalion Manchester Regiment he was killed in action in World War I. Buried at Neuville-Bourjonval British Cemetery.
Harry Crank GBR DIV 1908 †22 October 1917. Killed in action near Ypres Belgium.
Robert Davies GBR SHO 1912 †9 September 1916. A member of the 1st/9th Batallion; London Regiment (Queen Victoria's Rifles) he was killed in action in the Somme in France in World War I.
Louis de Champsavin FRA EQU 1900 †20 December 1916. Killed in action during World War I.
Felix Debax FRA FEN 1900 †25 August 1914. Killed in action in World War I.
Alex Decouteau CAN ATH 1912 †17 October 1917. Killed in action in the Battle of Passchendale.
Oszkár Demján HUN SWI 1912 †4 September 1914. Killed in action during World War I.
Charles Devendeville FRA SWI/WAP 1900 †19 September 1914. Killed in action.
Karl Baron von Diepurg GER IOC 1909-14 †25 October 1914. Killed in action during World War I.
Joseph Dines GBR FTB 1912 †27 September 1918. He was killed in Pas de Calais as a second lieutenant on the Western front during World War I.
Jimmy Duffy CAN ATH 1912 †23 April 1915. In September 1913 he joined the Canadian Army and was assigned to the 91st Argyle Regiment. On 23 April 1915 he was fatally wounded near Ypres Belgium.
Hugh Durant GBR MOP/SHO 1912 †21 January 1916. With the 9th Queen's Royal Lancers he was killed in action in France in World War I and is buried in the Vermelles British Cemetery.
George Fairbairn GBR ROW 1908 †20 June 1915. Killed in action in the Somme in France during World War I.
René Fenouillière FRA FTB 1908 †4 November 1916. Killed in action during World War I.
Léon Flameng FRA CYC 1896 †2 January 1917. Killed in action during World War I.
Alfred Flaxman GBR ATH 1908 †1 July 1916. Killed in an attack on the enemy positions at Gommecourt.
Bert Gayler GBR CYC 1912 †23 June 1917. Killed by rifle fire during an ambush in a valley near Kotkai Bozi Khel.
Bernhard von Gaza GER ROW 1908 †25 September 1917. Killed in action during World War I in Belgium.
Thomas Gillespie GBR ROW 1912 †18 October 1914. A lieutenant with the King's Own Scottish Borderers he was killed in action in France in World War I and is buried in Le Touret Memorial.
Henry Goldsmith GBR ROW 1908 †9 May 1915. Killed in action at Fromelles.
Lajos Gönczy HUN ATH 1900-06 †4 December 1915. Killed in action in area of Galicia and Lodomeria.
Carl Heinrich Goßler GER ROW 1900 †9 September 1914. Killed in action during World War I.
Wyndham Halswelle GBR ATH 1906-08 †31 March 1915. Killed by a sniper's bullet in France.
George Hawkins GBR ATH 1908 †22 September 1917. During World War I he served as a Gunner with the Royal Artillery and was killed in action when a shell exploded in the doorway of a dugout while he was on outpost duty.
Harold Hawkins GBR SHO 1908 †16 June 1917. Reported missing between Bullecourt and Croisilles. When last seen he was wounded; lying in a very forward position; which unfortunately had to be abandoned.
Cecil Healy ANZ/AUS SWI 1906-12 †29 August 1918. Killed in action in World War I.
Max Herrmann GER ATH 1912 †29 January 1915. Killed in action in World War I.
George Hutson GBR ATH 1912 †14 September 1914. Killed in action only five weeks after the outbreak of World War I.
Albert Jenicot FRA FTB 1908 †22 February 1916. An under-lieutenant with the 165th Regiment D Infantry he was killed in action in World War I.
Walther Jesinghaus GER GYM 1912 †1918. Killed in action during World War I.
Ernest Keeley RSA SHO 1912 †23 July 1918. A 2nd lieutenant with the 4th Regiment (South African Infantry Unit) he was killed in action in World War I and is buried in the Ploegsteert Memorial.
Frederick Kelly GBR ROW 1908 †13 November 1916. Killed in action during World War I.
Paul Kenna GBR EQU 1912 †30 August 1915. Killed in action at the Battle of Gallipoli.
Alister Kirby GBR ROW 1912 †29 March 1917. Served as a captain in the Rifle Brigade and died from illness in 1917.
Frederick Kitching GBR ATH 1908 †1914. Killed in action in World War I.
Adolf Kofler AUT CYC 1912 †13 April 1915. Killed in action during World War I.
Nikolay Kynin RUS FTB 1912 †1916. Killed during World War I.
Ivan Laing GBR HOK 1908 †30 November 1917. With the 2nd Battalion; Coldstream Guards he was killed in action in France during World War I and is buried in Metz-en-Couture Communal Cemetery; British Extension.
Octave Lapize FRA CYC 1908 †14 July 1917. Killed when his plane was shot down near Verdun.
Béla von Las-Torres HUN SWI 1908-12 †13 October 1915. Killed in action in Italy during World War I.
Henry Leeke GBR ATH 1908 †29 May 1915. Killed in action on the eve of his battalion's departure for Gallipoli.
Erich Lehmann GER ATH 1912 †9 July 1918. Listed as missing in action in World War I.
Feliks Leparsky RUS FEN 1912 †10 January 1917. Killed in action in World War I.
Bertrand Count de Lesseps FRA FEN 1908 †28 August 1918. Killed in action during World War I.
Ismaël de Lesseps FRA FEN 1908 †30 September 1915. Killed in action during World War I.
Eduard von Lütcken GER EQU 1912 †15 September 1914. Killed in action during World War I.
Georges Lutz FRA CYC 1908 †31 January 1915. Killed in action in World War I.
Willy Lützow GER SWI 1912 †1916. Killed in action during World War I.
William Lyshon USA WRE 1912 †13 October 1918. Killed in the final days of World War I.
Duncan Mackinnon GBR ROW 1908 †9 October 1917. Killed in action at Ypres in the Battle of Passchendaele.
Gilchrist Maclagan GBR ROW 1908 †25 April 1915. Killed in action in Pilckem Ridge at the Second Battle of Ypres.
Leopold Mayer AUT SWI 1906 †21 September 1914. Killed in action during World War I.
Alphonse Meignant FRA ROW 1912 †4 November 1914. Killed at First Battle of Ypres during World War I.
Robert Merz AUT FTB 1912 †30 August 1914. Killed in action during World War I.
Georg Mickler GER ATH 1912 †14 June 1915. Killed in action during World War I somewhere in Poland.
Felice Milano (DNS) ITA FTB 1912 †11 November 1915. Killed at the Fourth Battle of the Isonzo during World War I.
Percival Molson CAN ATH 1904 †5 July 1917. Killed in action when hit by mortar fire while attempting to rescue a fallen friend on the outskirts of Avignon France.
Alfred Motté FRA ATH 1908-12 †31 October 1918. Killed in action in World War I.
István Mudin HUN ATH 1906-08 †22 July 1918. Killed in action during World War I.
Edward Nash GBR EQU 1912 †21 February 1915. Killed in action during World War I.
Georges de la Nézière FRA ATH 1896 †9 October 1914. Killed in action during World War I.
Grigory Nikitin RUS FTB 1912 †1917. Killed during World War I.
Harcourt Ommundsen GBR SHO 1908-12 †19 September 1915. A Lieutenant in the Honourable Artillery Company when he was killed at the Battle of Ieper in World War I.
Alan Patterson GBR ATH 1908-12 †14 March 1916. Commissioned into the Royal Field Artillery he was killed in action only two days after his 30th birthday.
Árpád Pédery HUN GYM 1912 †21 October 1914. Killed in action during World War I.
Jacques Person GER ATH 1912 †15 July 1915. From Alsace; killed in action in Flanders as a member of the "7. Thüringische Infanterie Regiment Nr. 96".
William Philo GBR BOX 1908 †7 July 1916. Killed in World War I during the battle of the Somme in France.
Hermann Plaskuda GER FEN 1912 †21 March 1918. Killed in action in World War II. His grave is in the war cemetary in St. Quentin France.
Léon Ponscarme FRA CYC 1900 †24 November 1916. Killed in action in World War I in Verdun.
Kenneth Powell GBR ATH/TEN 1908-12 †18 February 1915. Killed in action while serving as a private in the HAC.
Friedrich Karl Prince von Preußen GER EQU 1912 †6 April 1917. During a flight on 21 March 1917 he was forced to land with a bullet in his engine and a slight wound to his foot. He landed his Albatros aircraft in no-man's land but while running towards his own lines he was severely wounded in the back by Australian troops. He was taken into Australian war captivity where he died from his injuries on 6 April 1917 at Saint-Étienne-du-Rouvray.
Reggie Pridmore GBR HOK 1908 †13 March 1918. Served as a major in the Royal Horse & Field Artillery winning a Military Cross on the Somme before being killed in action in Italy.
Joseph Racine FRA CYC 1912 †28 October 1914. With the 113th Regiment Infantry he was killed in action in World War I.
Thomas Raddall GBR SHO 1908 †9 August 1918. With the 8th Battalion Canadian Infantry Manitoba Regiment he was killed in action in France in World War I and is buried in the Manitoba Cemetery in Caix.
Maurice Raoul-Duval FRA POL 1900 †5 May 1916. Killed in action during World War I.
Josef Rieder GER CYC 1912 †13 July 1916. Killed in action during World War I.
John Robinson GBR HOK 1908 †23 August 1916. Commissioned into the North Staffordshire Regiment he was soon promoted to captain but died from injuries received in the Mesopotamian campaign.
Patrick Roche GBR ATH 1908 †7 June 1917. A lieutenant in the Royal Engineers he won an MC in World War I and was later killed in action.
Albert Rowland ANZ ATH 1908 †23 July 1918. Killed in action during the Second Battle of The Marne.
Marius Royet (DNS) FRA FTB 1908 †1915. Killed during World War I.
Maurice Salomez FRA ATH 1900 †7 August 1916. Killed in action in World War I.
Ronald Sanderson GBR ROW 1908 †17 April 1918. Killed in action near Ypres.
Heinrich Schneidereit GER TOW/WLT 1906 †30 September 1915. Killed in action as an artillery officer in France during World War I.
André Six FRA SWI 1900 †1914. Killed in action.
Pierre Six FRA FTB 1908 †7 July 1916. Killed in action during World War I.
Michel Soalhat FRA ATH 1906 †25 September 1915. Killed in action in World War I.
Robert Somers-Smith GBR ROW 1908 †1 July 1916. Killed in action on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
Geoffrey Taylor CAN ROW 1908-12 †24 April 1915. Missing; presumed killed; during the Second Battle of Ypres.
Felix Tekusch (DNS) AUT FTB 1912 †21 May 1916. Killed in action during World War I.
Waldemar Tietgens GER ROW 1900 †28 July 1917. Killed in action during World War I.
Dragutin Tomašević SRB ATH 1912 †1915. Killed in action during World War I in Serbia
Justin Vialaret FRA FTB 1908 †30 September 1916. Killed in action in World War I.
Charles Vigurs GBR GYM 1908-12 †22 February 1917. With the 11th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment he was killed in action in France in World War I and is buried in the Maroc British Cemetery in Grenay.
Amon Ritter von Gregurich HUN FEN 1900 †28 June 1915. Killed in action during World War I.
Edmond Wallace FRA FEN 1900 †18 August 1915. Killed in action in World War I.
Rudolf Watzl AUT WRE 1906 †15 August 1915. Died from illness during World War I.
Arthur Wear USA TEN 1904 †6 November 1918. As a result of refusing to obtain proper treatment for a probable perforated duodenal ulcer; he died; still commanding his battalion; during the Meuse-Argonne fighting.
Arthur Wilde GBR SHO 1908 †21 January 1916. With the 1st/6th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment he was killed in action in World War I and is buried in the Arras Memorial.
Tony Wilding ANZ TEN 1912 †9 May 1915. Joined the British army and was leading an armoured car unit when he was killed at Aubers Ridge during the Battle of Neuve-Chapelle.
Victor Willems BEL FEN 1908-12 †1918. Killed in action during World War I.
Edward Williams GBR ROW 1908 †12 August 1915. With the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards he was killed in action in France in World War I and is buried in the St. Venant Communal Cemetery.
Harold Wilson GBR ATH 1908 †1916. Killed in action in World War I.
Herbert Wilson GBR POL 1908 †11 April 1917. Was a captain with the Royal Horse Guards near Arras. Died in the preliminary skirmishes leading up to the Battle of Paschendaele in Ypres Belgium.
Richard Yorke GBR ATH 1908-12 †22 December 1914. Killed in action in World War I while serving as a sergeant in the London Scottish.
Béla Zulawszky HUN FEN 1908-12 †24 October 1914. Killed in action during World War I.